from The Great Debate:

Murders in the forest

By Olesia Plokhii
September 20, 2012

Since Apr. 26, a crusading forestry activist, a muckraking journalist and a 14-year-old girl have been killed in Cambodia because they tried to safeguard the country’s dwindling land reserves. They are all victims of a decade-long battle over Cambodia’s ecological future, a fight that in the past two years has turned more bloody and corrupt. Their deaths offer the world a stark vision of how crony capitalism has replaced totalitarianism as the threat to human rights in Southeast Asia. In Cambodia, the price of a human life pales in comparison with a blank check.

from Environment Forum:

Getting down to business at U.N. climate talks a hard task

August 4, 2010

[CROSSPOST blog: 12 post: 11721]

A United Nations flag is raised at the United Nations multi-agency compound near Herat November 5, 2009. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl

A U.N. concession to delegates at this week's climate talks in Bonn to take off jackets and ties due to recent high temperatures may be going to some participants' heads.

from Commodity Corner:

Getting down to business at U.N. climate talks a hard task

August 4, 2010

A U.N. concession to delegates at this week's climate talks in Bonn to take off jackets and ties due to recent high temperatures may be going to some participants' heads.

from Summit Notebook:

Paper executive would rather not shake on it

August 24, 2009

When it comes to hygiene, Hannu Kottonen is one executive who practices what he preaches. As the man who heads Metsa Tissue, a company that produces products ranging from tissues to toilet paper, he knows a thing or two about how germs spread. So when he visited the Thomson Reuters office in Helsinki to take part in the annual Reuters Paper and Packaging Summit, perhaps we should not have been surprised when he declined to shake the hands ot the various journalists assembled there.

from Summit Notebook:

Welcome to the 2009 Reuters Paper and Packaging Summit

August 23, 2009

The global paper industry has struggled for more than six years to claw its way out of a slump, as soft demand and overcapacity have kept prices down, leading to poor earnings, production curtailments and layoffs.