from The Great Debate:

Why the United States is always the loser in any free-trade deal

By Charles R. Morris
April 10, 2015

The YM Bamboo, a container ship operated by the China Ocean Shipping Company (COSCO) is docked at the Port of Oakland in Oakland, California

The YM Bamboo, a container ship operated by the China Ocean Shipping Company docked at the Port of Oakland in Oakland, California, January 14, 2011. REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach

from The Great Debate:

As free trade pacts expand, U.S. trade deficit soars. Why add one more?

By Leo Hindery Jr.
February 17, 2015

U.S. President Obama, Australian Prime Minister Abbott and Japanese Prime Minister Abe meet at the G20 in Brisbane

(L-R) President Barack Obama, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the G20 in Brisbane, November 16, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

from Breakingviews:

Review: Trade can bring war

By Guest Contributor
January 9, 2015

By Edward Chancellor

The author is a guest columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Few doubt that international trade usually increases the wealth of nations. Does it also bring peace? Many think so, but economic historian James Macdonald points out in “When Globalization Fails: The Rise and Fall of Pax Americana” that the last high point of globalization ended just over a century ago in a devastating world war – between countries which were also each other’s largest trading partners.

from The Great Debate:

Forging ahead with free trade

By Harold McGraw III
September 30, 2013

The recent focus on what divides world leaders, from Syria to the euro zone, has obscured the significant agreements reached at the Group of 20 meeting in St. Petersburg earlier this month. One of the most important was support for free trade and opposition to protectionism.

from The Great Debate:

The public supports a transatlantic trade pact – for now

By Bruce Stokes
February 19, 2013

The long-discussed free trade agreement between the United States and the European Union was formally endorsed by President Barack Obama in his State of the Union address to Congress. Obama asserted that “trade that is fair and free across the Atlantic supports millions of good-paying American jobs.” A prominent presidential endorsement will not prevent a long and disputatious negotiation, but a trade pact could yield potentially huge economic rewards -- and also provoke serious political opposition on both sides.

from James Pethokoukis:

There’s supporting free trade, and then there’s being a sucker

June 22, 2011

When the country engaging in mercantilist-protectionist policies is also your banker, I guess you tend to look the other way. My fellow CNBC contributor Peter Navarro makes the devastating case:

from Breakingviews:

Trade should leave China and India both winners

December 14, 2010

Decades of mistrust haven't stopped China and India's trade from tripling in the past five years. Now China wants to restart free trade talks when Premier Wen Jiabao visits New Delhi later this week. India has long resisted such an agreement. Yet more open trade should leave both sides winners.

from Rolfe Winkler:

Lunchtime Links 1-8

January 8, 2010

Bank regulators issue interest rate advisory (FFIEC) This may sound boring, but it's rather important. The FFIEC -- a collection of bank regulators including FDIC, OCC, the Fed, OTS and NCUA -- hasn't issued such a warning since 1996. It wants banks to make sure they can handle rising interest rates....which seems to me a HUGE disincentive to lend. 5% mortgages originated today will lose mucho value as rates go back up. This is a huge reason banks "aren't lending," because up is the only direction for rates to go!

from James Pethokoukis:

Obama, trade and the echoes of 1929

November 13, 2009

This is the most disturbing thing I have read in a while (via AP):

Trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia and Panama won't be put before Congress until it grapples first with President Barack Obama's pressing legislative goals, the U.S. commerce secretary said Friday. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said Obama has an ambitious high-priority legislative agenda focusing on health care, financial regulation and alternative energy. "Trade agreements are going to have to wait," he said at a luncheon hosted by the American Chamber of Commerce in Singapore. "Right now, the administration is focused on a very aggressive and very tight legislative agenda."

from James Pethokoukis:

How Obama can earn that Nobel Peace Prize

October 9, 2009

The Nobel Committee in Norway says it awarded President Barack Obama the 2009 Peace Prize for "his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples." (Congratulations, Mr. President.) In particular, the committee noted Obama's multilateral approach on the issues of climate chance and nuclear disarmament.