Archive

Reuters blog archive

from India Masala:

Vishwaroopam: Saga of faith in troubled times

Photo

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author, and not necessarily of Reuters)

For a spy thriller that has been in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons, "Vishwaroopam" is surprisingly tame.

What I'll remember most about "Vishwaroopam" is its technical finesse, breathtaking locations, stark imagery and a crisp edit.

The film, released as "Vishwaroop" in north India, features at least three different religions and five nationalities. It never takes a stance on which God is greater, nor does it brand you a freedom fighter or a radical militant. The central message is that bloodshed will lead to more bloodshed.

from India Insight:

“Vishwaroopam” touches yet another Indian nerve

Photo

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author, and not necessarily of Reuters)

Actor and filmmaker Kamal Haasan’s film "Vishwaroopam" was supposed to open in cinemas last Friday, but that's not happening in Tamil Nadu after Muslim groups protested against scenes that they consider offensive.

from India Insight:

Media in India: fine line between regulation and freedom

Photo

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author, and not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

If you are a journalist in India or have been around people who work in the field, you might have heard these comments:

from India Insight:

No criticism please, we are Indians

Photo

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author, and not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

When I signed up for a Facebook account four years ago, a friend warned me it was "dangerous for your sanity" -- of course, she meant it in terms of the time I would spend peeking into other people’s lives (She was right). But on Monday, for 21-year-old Shaheen Dhada, that phrase took on a whole new meaning.

from The Great Debate:

How financial lawsuits muzzle free speech

Imagine some political group runs an advertisement accusing a politician of misleading statements and covering up his true voting record. Instead of denouncing the attack or countering with a favorable ad, however, the candidate sues the political group for billions of dollars, launching a six-year, scorched-earth legal and public relations campaign.

Even though the legal battle collapses and the candidate spends about $100 million, the gambit works: The politician’s future elections are assured, because no rival or reporter dares publicly criticize the candidate lest they be sued.

from John Lloyd:

A deserving press

By John Lloyd
The opinions expressed are his own.

An inquiry under way in the Royal Courts of Justice London, just a few hundred yards from Fleet Street, once the heart of the British newspaper industry, is becoming -- in the low key way in which the British like to think they always do things (but often don't) -- a global event. It is the consequence of a crisis, as inquiries frequently are. But it will have consequences of its own: one of these may be to redefine journalism for the 21st century.

In July, the forward march of Rupert Murdoch and his son James through the British media and political establishment was halted -- cruelly, abruptly, with every sign of the chaos and clamor which his tabloids usually love, indeed often create. The efforts by his British newspaper subsidiary, News International, to lock in the narrative that phone hacking at the Sunday tabloid News of the World was the preserve of one "rogue" reporter in 2006 -- Clive Goodman, the Royal Correspondent, who had paid for his sins with a short sharp prison sentence -- fell apart. Like Marley's ghost from Dickens' "A Christmas Carol", the awful truth came through the door, dragging a clanking chain made up of mobile phones, mementos of the hackings into the private lives of this celebrity and that politician and, most horrible, of ordinary people, caught in some media storm, for a few days the biggest story in town, and thus regarded as fair game.

from FaithWorld:

German Chancellor Merkel honours Mohammad cartoonist at press award

Photo

merkelChancellor Angela Merkel paid tribute to freedom of speech on Wednesday at a ceremony for a Dane whose cartoon of the Prophet Mohammad provoked Muslim protests that led to 50 deaths five years ago.

Merkel, who grew up in Communist East Germany, recalled her joy over the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989. "Freedom for me personally is the happiest experience of my life," Merkel, 56, said at the conference on press freedom in Potsdam near Berlin.

from FaithWorld:

Support lower for Muslim-backed U.N. text on defamation of religion

UNGA

United Nations General Assembly, 24 Sept 2009/Ray Stubblebine

The U.N. General Assembly condemned defamation of religion for the fifth year running on Friday but support continued to erode for a resolution Western countries say threatens freedom of speech.

The assembly passed the Islamic-sponsored resolution with 80 votes in favor, 61 against and 42 abstentions. That compared with 86 votes to 53 against with 42 abstentions for a similar text last year and figures of 108-51-25 in 2007, the last time the measure commanded an absolute majority of U.N. members.

from The Great Debate UK:

Internet freedom prevails over Guardian gag order

Photo

padraig_reidy- Padraig Reidy is news editor at Index on Censorship. The opinions expressed are his own.-

Solicitors Carter-Ruck have withdrawn the terms of an injunction preventing the Guardian from reporting a parliamentary question by Newcastle-under-Lyme Labour MP and former journalist Paul Farrelly.

from FaithWorld:

Germany asks if Islam impedes on freedom of speech

Photo

GERMANY/A decision by the German publisher Droste not to print a murder mystery about an honour killing because it contained passages insulting Islam has raised questions in Germany about religion impeding on freedom of speech.

Droste publishers said they would have published the book, entitled "To Whom Honour is Due", had author Gabriele Brinkmann softened the tone in some sections In one, for example, an angry character tells another to dispose of a Koran using a crude phrase we would not reproduce here. "The author was not prepared to change the derogatory passages, which would have  been a condition for the publication," Droste said in a statement on its website.

  •