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from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

Activist investors don’t wait for red to sell

Stocks bleeding red are generally a good play for a short seller, who is betting on falling values. Yet activist investors do not wait for rattled markets the likes of which befell markets on Wednesday to sell short a particular company’s stock. Embedded in their sales pitch are well-crafted theories that attempt to challenge Wall Street’s sell-side mentality and, with that, reap a potential cash windfall.

Sahm Adrangi, founder, Kerrisdale Capital Mgmnt

Sahm Adrangi, founder, Kerrisdale Capital Mgmnt

Sahm Adrangi, founder and chief investment officer of Kerrisdale Capital, is among a group of small social media savvy funds who pitch some of their research to the public. Before stocks sank on Wednesday, Adrangi had been pounding the media circuit to get his message out about satellite communications company Globalstar (GSAT), which, he says, has no equity value.

“It’s a multi-billion dollar company that we think is worth zero,” he told the Global Markets Forum.

“Globalstar has been a satellite phone company for years, that satellite phone company is worth less than the company’s debt. When you look really into the details of what Globalstar is proposing, a paid WiFi channel, it doesn’t make any sense. It’s never going to be commercially viable. As a result the equity is worth less than the value of the company’s debt,” he also said in an interview with Reuters Insider.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

GMF @HedgeWorld West, World Bank/IMF and Financial & Risk Summit Toronto 2014

(Updates with guest photos and new links).

Join our special coverage Oct. 6-10 in the Global Markets Forum as we hit the road, from the West Coast to Washington to the Great White North.

GMF will be live next week from the HedgeWorld West conference in Half Moon Bay, California, where we’ll be blogging insight from speakers including Peter Thiel, former San Francisco 49ers great Steve Young and other panelists' viewpoints on the most important investment themes, allocation strategies, reputation risk management ideas and more.

from Breakingviews:

Europe’s investors miss value cues, again

By Robert Cole

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

It is one of the oldest rules in the investment book: buy what’s cheap, sell what’s expensive. The current crop of European fund managers must have slept through that lesson.

from Global Investing:

New frontiers to outpace emerging markets

Fund managers searching for yield are increasing exposure to frontier markets (FM) as a diversification from emerging markets (EM), as the latter have been offering negative relative returns since January, according to MSCI data.

Barings Asset Management  said on Monday it plans to launch a frontier markets fund in coming weeks, with a projected 70 percent exposure to frontier markets such as Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Sri Lanka and Ukraine.

from Breakingviews:

Fund managers should be able to say no to new cash

It stands to reason that the more money flowing to a particular investment strategy, the more likely returns will diminish. By logical extension, fund managers should therefore occasionally say no to new cash to keep from hurting performance. But in the money business, that's easier said than done, especially when considering the growing number of alternative asset managers that are publicly traded.

For a fund manager with shareholders to please, this makes for a potential conflict of interest with investors in its funds. The more assets a firm gathers, the greater its earnings. That's particularly true in more specialized arenas of the investment world, such as private equity, distressed debt, event-driven and convertible arbitrage, where the fees typically amount to 2 percent a year plus a 20 percent slice of any profit.

from Global Investing:

Live Blog from Reuters Funds Summit in Luxembourg

[CROSSPOST blog: 1036 post: 2792]

Original Post Text:

from Funds Hub:

UCITS IV Everyone

It is early days at the Reuters fund summit in Luxembourg, but already a few themes are building. For one thing, no one seems to be too negative about the investment climate.

For the most part, however, the attendees are focused on how the industry will recuperate from the battering it has suffered during the financial crisis. Again, there appears to be a degree of optimism. Most of the talk is about UCITS IV, which is fundspeak for a new kind of pan-European fund that is easier to distribute.

from Summit Notebook:

Tax evaders on the run

  By Neil Chatterjee
    The U.S. has promised it will hunt down tax evaders.
    And it seems tax evaders are on the run.
    DBS bank, based in the growing offshore financial centre of
Singapore, told Reuters it had been approached by U.S. citizens
asking for its private banking services. But when told they would
have to sign U.S. tax declaration forms, the potential clients
disappeared.  
    Swiss banks also approached DBS on the hope they could
offload troublesome U.S. clients to a location that so far has
not been reached by the strong arms of Washington or Brussels.
    DBS said no thanks. In fact many private banks and boutique
advisors now seem to be avoiding U.S. clients.
    Will this spread to other nationalities, as governments
invest in tax spies and tax havens invest in white paint?
    Is this the end of offshore private private banking?

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