Archive

Reuters blog archive

from MacroScope:

When is a war not a war?

Is it war if no shots have been fired? The Ukrainians say so but Moscow, its grip on Crimea now pretty much complete, says it is merely protecting its people. The rest of the world and its financial markets watch on very uneasily.

There is virtually no chance of any western military response after Vladimir Putin declared he had the right to invade his neighbour – NATO  expressed "grave concern" but did not come up with any significant measures to apply pressure on. But there will be a diplomatic and economic price to pay.

The rouble tumbled by 2.5 percent at Monday’s open and the central bank has already acted to try and underpin it, raising its key lending rate by 1.5 percentage points although the Russian economy is already in poor shape. The main Russian stock index has plunged by about 9 percent with Gazprom doing worse than that and safe haven German Bund futures have jumped.

Already the talk is of shunning Russia’s G8 summit later in the year. America’s John Kerry, who will visit Kiev on Tuesday, has put visa bans, asset freezes and trade isolation on the table, saying U.S. business may well want to think again about involvement in Russia. Putting pressure on Russia’s oligarchs could be one way of exerting leverage.

from MacroScope:

G8 — plenty to worry about

The week kicks off with a G8 leaders’ summit in Northern Ireland. Syria will dominate the gathering and the British agenda on tax avoidance is likely to be long on rhetoric, short on binding specifics.

But for the economics file, this meeting could still yield big news. For a start, Japanese prime minister Abe is there – the man who has launched one of the most aggressive stimulus drives in history yet has already seen the yen climb back to the level it held before he started.

from MacroScope:

A week to reckon with

The week kicks off with a G8 leaders’ summit in Northern Ireland. Syria will dominate the gathering and the British agenda on tax avoidance is likely to be long on rhetoric, short on specifics. But for the markets, this meeting could still yield some big news. For a start, Japanese prime minister Abe is there – the man who has launched one of the most aggressive stimulus drives in history yet has already seen the yen climb back to the level it held before he started. Abe will also speak in London and Warsaw during the week.

The financial backdrop could hardly be more volatile with emerging markets selling off dramatically since the Federal Reserve warned the pace of its dollar creation could be slowed. Berlin has said the G8 leaders are likely to discuss the role of central banks and monetary policy, and Angela Merkel will hold bilateral talks with Abe during the summit. President Barack Obama travels to Berlin after the summit for talks with Merkel.

from MacroScope:

Merkel under pressure … but unbending

Some interesting events to  ponder over the weekend, though not many of them came from the G8 summit which, as is customary, was strong on rhetoric but bare of any specific policy measures to tackle the euro zone crisis. However, markets seems to have tired of their panicky last few sessions. German Bund futures have opened lower as investors took profits rather than seizing on any positive news. European stocks have edged up.

It does appear that with the ascension of France's Francois Hollande, the G8 firmament turned into G7 (or maybe 5 since we didn’t hear much from Japan and Russia) versus 1 (Germany) but as things stand we’re still heading for a fairly anaemic “growth strategy” unless euro zone leaders coalesce behind the notion of giving Spain and Greece longer to make the cuts demanded of them. Spain has moved the goalposts further in the wrong direction, revising its 2011 deficit up to 8.9 percent from 8.5 and blaming the overspending regions. That means its already loosened target of 5.3 percent for this year is now even harder to achieve.

from MacroScope:

Can Greek public opinion be turned?

So we’ve got the fresh Greek elections we expected and markets, despite the inevitability that we would get here, have reacted with some alarm. European stocks have shed  around 1 percent, and the harbour of German Bunds is pushing their futures price up in early trade. The Greeks will try to form a caretaker government today to see them through to elections expected on June 17.

The key question is whether the mainstream parties can mount a convincing campaign second time around, playing on the glaring contradiction in SYRIZA’s position (no to bailout, yes to the euro) and essentially turning the vote into a referendum on euro membership, which the overwhelming majority of Greeks still support. Don’t count on that. SYRIZA remains ahead in the polls.
To be able to pull it off, PASOK and New Democracy will need some help from Europe. There have already been hints from Brussels that if a pro-bailout government is formed, Athens could be given some leeway on its debt-cutting terms. But equally other voices are saying there is no more room for manoeuvre.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

When the top brass goes to Europe…

Hey Blog Guy, we could use some of your famous travel advice. My brass ensemble is going to Paris, and we....

Are you out of your mind? Don't you know the French can't stand brass instruments? You could be arrested before you play a single note.

from MacroScope:

Protesters converge to press anti-poverty message

Police threaded through a growing throng of demonstrators gathering in a downtown Toronto Park on Friday to demand G20 countries do more to fight global poverty and protect woman's gender rights.

As the number of protesters grew under Canada's trademark leafy maple trees, pro bono lawyers announced their phone numbers and told protesters to write them down on their hands or arms.

from MacroScope:

Duelling protests hit Huntsville as G8 kicks off

G8 host Huntsville has been a picture of quiet in the run-up to the summit, which kicked off on Friday. Reporters that have come up to cover potential protests have had little luck so far uncovering anything beyond bemused residents and hundreds of bored cops.

So there was more than a little excitement Friday when not one, but two protests sprang up in the summer resort town’s center. A media stunt by Oxfam involving the group’s famous paper mache “heads” of world leaders drew a throng of reporters and camera crews to a waterfront park in the resort town’s center.

from MacroScope:

So much for all this summitry

Toronto G20The following is a guest post by Marc Levinson, a senior fellow for international business at the Council on Foreign Relations. The opinions expressed are his own.

The world’s leaders are stuck on a summitry treadmill. Nothing better could come from this week’s summit meetings in Canada than a way for them to get off.

from Africa News blog:

West must change approach to Africa

SUDAN/Tom Cargill, Assistant Head of the Africa Programme at Chatham House, writes on the West's relationship with Africa:

French President Nicholas Sarkozy put it best this week, when he spoke of the increasing important of Africa in Global Affairs: "Africa's formidable demographics and its considerable resources make it the main reservoir for world economic growth in the decades to come."

  •