from The Great Debate:

How Chief Justice John Roberts made himself a footnote to history

By Elizabeth B. Wydra
June 29, 2015

Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts is pictured on the front plaza of the Supreme Court in Washington

Chief Justice John Roberts on the front plaza of the Supreme Court in Washington, October 1, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing/Files

from The Great Debate:

Even Christian Evangelicals are warming to gay marriage

By Matthew Vines
June 26, 2015

Casey Kend of New York and a supporter of gay marriage holds a sign in front of the Supreme Court in Washington

Casey Kend, a supporter of gay marriage, holds a sign in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

from The Great Debate:

Irish plunge stake through Catholic Church’s heart

By John Lloyd
June 5, 2015

A Yes campaigner poses for a picture in Dublin Castle as Ireland holds a referendum on gay marriage

A Yes campaigner poses for a picture in Dublin Castle as Ireland holds a referendum on gay marriage May 23, 2015. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

from American Insights:

The Supremes and gay marriage

April 29, 2015

If the Supreme Court rules against gay marriage at this point, it could potentially invalidate thousands of same sex-unions across 37 states. Such a decision would also show just how far behind the rest of the country the court is on the issue.

from Alison Frankel:

On one-year Windsor anniversary, 9th Circuit delivers best gay rights gift

By Alison Frankel
June 25, 2014

Sometimes, the best way to understand the broad implications of a court's decision isn't to read the ruling itself but rather the dissent. That was certainly true a year ago, when Justice Antonin Scalia attacked the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Windsor v. U.S., which struck down federal prohibitions on same-sex marriage as an unconstitutional intrusion on the equal rights of gays and lesbians. The majority's ruling was carefully constrained, but a furious Scalia predicted that the stirring language of Justice Anthony Kennedy's opinion would reverberate more loudly in the lower courts than the actual holding. As we now know from decisions all over the country striking down restrictions on same-sex marriage, Scalia was right.

from Data Dive:

Gay marriage is still in limbo in Wisconsin

June 9, 2014

The march toward legalizing gay marriage across the country continued last Friday, when a federal judge declared Wisconsin’s ban on it unconstitutional. Clerks in two counties started issuing marriage licenses on Friday, according to Reuters.

from Blogs Dashboard:

Big wins for the freedom to marry. Now let’s finish the job.

By Evan Wolfson
June 26, 2013

Reggie Stanley (R) and Rocky Galloway embrace as they are married in Washington.

Nearly two years after we were pronounced married by New York state in front of our family and friends, my husband and I are finally married in the eyes of the federal government.

from The Great Debate:

A victory for gays and for families

By Jeff Chu
June 26, 2013

I didn’t expect to cry on my wedding day. But there I was last September, in my Cape Cod backyard, trussed up in suit and tie, waiting for my soon-to-be husband at our makeshift altar, and the tears came. I wish I could say they were two camera-ready teardrops, wending their way down my left cheek. But no. In reality, I got a monsoon -- I was a sobbing, near-hyperventilating mess. The importance of what we were doing had just hit me: We were pledging, in public symbol and sacred promise, to build and sustain a life together.

from The Great Debate:

Big wins for the freedom to marry. Now let’s finish the job.

By Evan Wolfson
June 26, 2013

Reggie Stanley (R) and Rocky Galloway embrace as they are married in Washington.

Nearly two years after we were pronounced married by New York state in front of our family and friends, my husband and I are finally married in the eyes of the federal government.

from Mark Leonard:

Protests in France are more than a battle over culture

By Mark Leonard
April 22, 2013

In many of the same French squares and streets that were occupied in the general strikes of 1968, a new generation has been re-inventing the art of protest for the age of Twitter. Their focus has been opposing a law that would legalize gay marriage, which is expected to pass a final legislative hurdle on Tuesday. Although the protests may be misdirected, they are a symptom of the crisis this generation faces in influencing its government and economy in France.