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from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

Ebola will not be the last global epidemic, time to hit the reset button on how we treat it -physician

Ebola will not be the last global epidemic. It is, however, the first to spread as we hop on planes, rely on oil and chocolate from far flung locales and blindly lean on modern medicine’s ability to control and kill the very pathogens that live among us.

Dr. Bill Miller

Dr. Bill Miller

Now is the time to hit the reset button on our approach to viral outbreaks. While it’s taken health agencies, drug makers and the public-at-large time to wake up to the current spread of the deadly virus in Africa, there's no time like the present to prepare for the next outbreak, Dr. Bill Miller, a physician and author of “The Microcosm Within: Evolution and Extinction in the Hologenome” said in an interview on Thursday.

A hologenome is essentially an organism’s sum of its parts, a combination of its cells and all the microbes (bacteria and viruses) that live within it. It’s the bacteria in your gut that helps your body break down food and the cold virus that makes you sick.

Ebola is just another microbe in a long list of those that seek to destroy its host, Miller says. His theories are a challenge to die-hard Darwinists, who, in turn, have challenged him. He has studied the intersection between immunology and infectious disease and says “our evolutionary narrative is different from Darwinian natural selection alone.”

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

China economic reforms may result in $14.4 trillion GDP, growth at 6 percent – Asia Society report

Sweeping economic reform initiated by China President Xi Jinping in November 2013 marked a turning point for the world's second biggest economy. If implemented fully, China's potential GDP growth can be sustained at 6 percent through 2020. One risk: Falling short of that growth rate could result in growth at half that projection, or worse, leading to a new economic crisis, according to a new study.

Dan Rosen, founding partner, Rhodium Group

Dan Rosen, founding partner, Rhodium Group

Dan Rosen, author of a report for the Asia Society Policy Institute, argues that China's growth model is no longer working. The drivers that contributed to China's post-1978 growth are weakening, with existing investments showing diminished returns and overall total-factor productivity, or TFP, falling. TFP is an economic term that broadly measures efficiency using input factors such as labor and capital. "Demographic dividends propelled China through the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, but the labor force is now at its largest and is poised to shrink," he writes.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

Ebola’s “worst case” economic impact may total more than $40 billion – World Bank’s Evans

As world leaders gather this week for the annual International Monetary Fund and World Bank  autumn meetings, Ebola will be top on the list of priorities. Apart from the human toll, the economic impact will be felt for at least a couple of years, said David Evans, senior economist of the World Bank’s Africa Division.

David Evans, senior economist, World Bank's Africa region

David Evans, senior economist, World Bank's Africa region

"What we see is that in the short run, by the end of this year, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone are likely to be about $359 million poorer than they would have been in the absence of the Ebola outbreak,” Evans told the Global Markets Forum ahead of the meetings. “With our estimates of the impact of West Africa alone, even in a less tragic case, the lost GDP is likely to run into the billions. And in a worse case, we have even higher numbers (more than $40 billion).”

from Global Investing:

Steroids, punch bowls and the music still playing: stocks dance into 2014

Four years into the stock market party fueled by a punch bowl overflowing with trillions of dollars of central bank liquidity, you'd think a hangover might be looming.

But almost all of the fund managers attending the London leg of the Reuters Global Investment Summit this week - with some $4 trillion of assets under management - say the party will continue into 2014.

from Global Investing:

‘Peace-ing’ together the world…

If only it were this easy.

 

The United Nations General Assembly begins its annual meeting next week with the overhang of chemical weapons diplomacy in Syria and a diplomatic dance over Iran’s nuclear aspirations (and the distrust by much of the West of Tehran’s intentions). That creates a tantalizing prospect of the two, U.S. President Barack Obama and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, taking a face-to-face spin together on the global stage.

But it was all about getting down to business on Friday at the Grand Hyatt hotel in New York where the UN Global Compact and the LEGO Foundation unveiled a 1.65 meter tall replica of the UN headquarters. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon playfully pointed out his office. He was joined by LEGO Foundation chairman Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen and its chief executive officer Dr. Randa Grob-Zakhary, who want the way children play to be re-defined and the learning process to be re-imagined.

from Global Investing:

Russian stocks: big overweight

Emerging stocks are not much in favour these days -- Bank of America/Merrill Lynch's survey of global fund managers finds that in August just a net 18 percent of investors were overweight emerging markets, among the lowest since 2001. Within the sector though, there are some outright winners and quite a few losers. Russian stocks are back in favour, the survey found, with a whopping 92 percent of fund managers overweight. Allocations to Russia doubled from last month (possibly at the expense of South African where underweight positions are now at 100 percent, making it the most unloved market of all) See below for graphic:

BofA points out its analyst Michael Harris recently turned bullish on Russian stocks advising clients to go for a "Big Overweight" on a market that he reckons is best positioned to benefit from the recovery in global growth.

from Global Investing:

BRIC shares? At the right price

Is the price right? Many reckon that the sell off in emerging markets and growing disenchantment with the developing world's growth story is lending fresh validity to the value-based investing model.

That's especially so for the four BRIC economies, where shares have underperformed for years thanks either to an over-reliance on commodities, excessive valuations conferred by a perception of fast growth or simply dodgy corporate governance. Now with MSCI's emerging equity index down 30 percent from 2007 peaks, prices are looking so beaten down that some players, even highly unlikely ones, are finding value.

from Global Investing:

Weekly Radar: A ‘sudden stop’ in emerging markets?

Turkey's lira, South Africa's rand and South Korea's won have all lunged, local currency debt yields have suddenly surged, there's an intense investor focus on domestic political risks again and governments like Brazil who were taxing what they feared were excessive foreign investment over the past couple of years have U-turned as those flows evaporate. 

What some have feared for many months may well be materializing – a ‘sudden stop’ in financing flows to emerging markets as the makings of a perfect storm gathers. With the Fed mulling some reduction in the amount of dollars it’s pumping into the world, the prospect of a rare and protracted rise in the dollar and U.S. Treasury yields potentially changes entire EM investment metrics for U.S. funds (who make up almost half of the world’s private institutional investors) and from markets which have willingly or not been some of the biggest beneficiaries of QE in recent years but also to where where , by some estimates, nearly $8 trillion of FDI and portfolio flows have flowed over the past decade. It doesn’t even have to mean a reversal of capital already in emerging markets, but even a sudden stop in new flows there could seriously undermine the currency and debt markets of countries heavily dependent on rolling foreign financing - those with large current account gaps to finance. As emerging and global economic growth has eased and return on equity sinks, emerging equity markets have already underperformed for three years now. But the biggest wave of recent investment in EM had been into its bond markets, most recently to higher-yielding local-currency debt markets. And it’s these flows that could dry up rather quickly and shockingly, with all the attendant pressure on currency rates and vice versa. For context, a record of more than $410 billion new sovereign and corporate bonds from emerging economies were sold last year alone, according to JPMorgan, and Morgan Stanley estimates show emerging companies alone have sold some $130 billion worth of new debt so far this year – up 30 percent on last year and more than twice the same period in 2011.
               Already we’re seeing big hits to big current account deficit countries Turkey and South Africa in this region and, as is so often the case in emerging markets, the withdrawal of capital leads to an intense focus on domestic and political risks. These are two of the five biggest destination for bond flows over the past four years, a list –measured on flows as share of GDP – also includes Poland and Czech Republic. Mexico is top of the list, but many see its geographic and financial proximity to the US insulating it.

from Global Investing:

Weekly Radar: Central banks try to regain some control

Central banks may be regaining some two-way control over global markets that had started to behave like a one-way bet. After flagging some unease earlier this month that frothy markets were assuming endless QE, the Fed and others look to be responding with at least some frank reality checks even if little new in the substance of their message. In truth, there may be no real change in the likely timing of QE's end, or even the beginning of its end, but the size of the stock and bond market pullbacks on Wednesday and Thursday shows how sensitive they now are to the ebb and flow of central bank guidance on that score.  Although the 7% drop in Japan's stock market looks alarming - Fed chief Bernanke actually played it fairly straight, signalling no imminent change and putting any possible wind down over the "next few meetings" still heavily conditional on a much lower jobless rate and higher inflation rate. The control he gains from here is an ability to nuance that message either way if either the data disappoints or markets get out of hand.

The central banks are clearly treading a fine line between getting traction in the real economy and not blowing new financial bubbles. The decider may be inflation and on that score central banks have a lot of leeway right now – global inflation is still evaporating and, as measured by JPM, fell in April to just 2.0% - its lowest in 3-1/2 years.  That said, CPI was also very well behaved in the run-up to 2007 credit crisis - it was asset prices and not consumer inflation that caused the problem. So - expect to hear plenty more cat-and-mouse on this from the central banks over the coming weeks/months.

from Global Investing:

South African rand slides as labour unrest grows

The South African rand has lost most ground amongst emerging market currencies, according to Reuters data, falling almost 10 percent so far this year to hit 4-year lows against the dollar.

That is perhaps not so surprising given the country's high level of dependence on the minerals and mining sectors, which have been disrupted by labour strikes along the same lines evident in the summer of 2012. Lonmin, the world's third largest producer of metal, said it stopped its production of its Marikana mine near Rustenburg following strikes over wages.

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