from Breakingviews:

Facebook and Google catch glimpse of split future

October 9, 2014

By Richard Beales

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from Jack Shafer:

The dangers of deputizing Google to bust child pornographers

By Jack Shafer
August 5, 2014

Illustration file picture shows a man typing on a computer keyboard in Warsaw

"Don't be evil" -- the first sentence of Google's "Code of Conduct" -- has served as the technology company's corporate motto since its earliest days. But given Google's role in the arrest late last month of a Houston man on child pornography charges, perhaps we've been misreading it. Perhaps the motto is aimed at its customers, as in, "Don't you be evil or we'll have you busted."

from The Great Debate UK:

The ‘Right to be Forgotten’: Something to remember

By Guest Contributor
July 31, 2014

--Steve Girdler is managing director for EMEA at HireRight, a global provider of candidate due diligence services. The opinions expressed are his own--

from Jack Shafer:

The truth is, you’ve never had the ‘right to be forgotten’

By Jack Shafer
July 15, 2014

An illustration picture shows a Google logo with two one Euro coins

A recent ruling by Europe's top court has given its people a "right to be forgotten." Google and other search engines must now delete "inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant, or excessive" information from search queries when a European individual requests it, even when the info is true. This isn't a classic case of censorship: the "offending" pages produced by newspapers and other websites will go untouched. Google and the other search engines just won't be allowed to link to them.

from Alison Frankel:

Kozinski amends opinion in 9th Circuit ‘Innocence’ case v. Google

By Alison Frankel
July 15, 2014

Something strange happened Friday in the infamous case of Cindy Lee Garcia v. Google at the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Chief Judge Alex Kozinski, who wrote the opinion in February that enjoined Google from linking to the anti-Islam film "Innocence of Muslims," filed an amended opinion, even as the entire 9th Circuit considers Google's petition for en banc review of the controversial February ruling.

from Stories I’d like to see:

Google’s lost links, U.S. border crossing guards and when a Tea Party loss is a win

By Steven Brill
July 15, 2014

A Google search page is seen through a magnifying glass in this photo illustration taken in Brussels

1. Google’s dilemma:

Writing in the Guardian last week, Google general counsel David Drummond described the trouble the European unit of his company is having trying to implement a European Union court’s decision that the search giant must eliminate links to certain web articles or postings about people that these people claim are unduly embarrassing.

from Edward Hadas:

Google and the right to be forgotten

By Edward Hadas
July 9, 2014

The public has a right to know. Individuals have a right to privacy. The common good is served by both these contradictory statements, so someone has to decide how to balance them when they come into conflict. When it comes to internet search, the European Union’s Court of Justice has given the job to search engine providers such as Google. In a way, that’s a good call.

from Breakingviews:

Heed New York Times governance risk headlines

May 21, 2014

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: ITT’s ghost hangs over Silicon Valley

May 20, 2014

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Alison Frankel:

Lesson from the smartphone wars: Litigation is not a business plan

By Alison Frankel
May 19, 2014

After almost five years of suing each other in courts in the United States and Europe over patents on mobile devices, Apple and Google abruptly announced Friday night that they've called a ceasefire: They're dropping all of the litigation. They're not even making a deal to cross-license one another's IP, just declaring a truce and walking away.