from The Great Debate:

Populism: The Democrats’ great divide

By Robert L. Borosage
February 5, 2014

One day after President Barack Obama called for moving forward on trade authority in his State of the Union address, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) declared, “I am against fast track,” and said he had no intention of bringing it to a vote in the Senate.

from The Great Debate:

Filling judicial vacancies to protect the progressive legacy

By Herman Schwartz
January 13, 2014

What could never happen, finally did.

For more than 30 years the Democratic Senate caucus feebly stood by as Republicans seized control of the federal courts. Now, however, faced with a GOP filibuster of nominees for three vacancies on the appeals court that could determine the fate of most of President Barack Obama’s initiatives, the Democrats have at last responded.

from The Great Debate:

The Senate after filibuster reform

By Thomas E. Mann
November 25, 2013

The Washington Post editorial page led the charge in denouncing the change in Senate filibuster rules engineered by Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and 51 of his Democratic colleagues last Thursday. Many other media voices quickly followed suit.

from Reihan Salam:

What the filibuster’s demise means for the Supreme Court

By Reihan Salam
November 22, 2013

Now that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has ended the filibuster for district and appeals court nominees and executive branch appointments, it’s only a matter of time before the filibuster goes away for Supreme Court nominations and legislation as well. Reid’s decision has been a long time coming: One of his predecessors, Republican Bill Frist, came very close to ending the filibuster in 2005.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Can Tea Party afford the shutdown cost?

By Nicholas Wapshott
October 23, 2013

Victories come in many sizes. The Battle of the Little Bighorn, for example, at first seemed an overwhelming win for the Sioux. But it soon became clear their success would not last. Who really won the Alamo? The Mexicans? Try telling that to a Texan. So, who won the Battle of the Shutdown 2013? The conventional view is that the Tea Party Republicans were seen off by the congressional leadership in both parties. Having made their protest, disrupted the nation and cost Americans a great deal in anxiety, time and treasure, they lost the battle -- but promise to resume the war another day. Perhaps as early as January.

from The Great Debate:

Class war in the new Gilded Age

By Robert L. Borosage
December 21, 2012

2012 was the first class-warfare election of our new Gilded Age. The first since the middle class has come to understand, in the words of new Senator-elect Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), that the “rules are rigged against it.” Business-as-usual may no longer be acceptable.

from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra – Comfort zones

July 5, 2011

Senators are talking. The president is talking. But whether they are talking at or with each other is another question.

from Entrepreneurial:

Senate kills federal innovation research program

By Guest Contributor
May 20, 2011

-- Robin Enos is a contributor to FindLaw's Free Enterprise blog. FindLaw is a Thomson Reuters publication. This article originally appeared here. --

from Tales from the Trail:

Standing room only at Social Security rally

March 28, 2011

Social Security rock stars? Senate Democrats held a rally that turned into almost a religious revival-type event on Capitol Hill where they were treated like rock stars by a standing-room only audience.

from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra – Two weeks

March 1, 2011

Perhaps the fifth time will be the charm. (Don't hold your breath).

OBAMA-SPEECH/Looks like legislation to keep the government funded for another two weeks is heading for approval. "I think we'll have a vote on that in the next 48 hours," Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said.