from The Human Impact:

“They told me to have a sex change” – Iranian lesbian

June 30, 2014

Sara, a bright young woman studying for a masters at Tehran University, is a lesbian – but if the Iranian authorities had their way, she would change her sex and become a man.

from The Human Impact:

Catch 22: Steven’s story of statelessness in Britain

June 2, 2014

Three years ago Steven walked into a police station in the British city of Cardiff and asked to be arrested even though he hadn’t committed any crime. When the police refused, he asked if it would help if he insulted an officer. They refused again.

from Global Investing:

Discovering Pyongyang’s view with a North Korean diplomat

May 21, 2014

Last week I went to a very unique session on North Korea which featured a rare appearance of a North Korean diplomat, at London-based policy institute Chatham House.

from The Human Impact:

Where does human trafficking happen? Right in front of you

March 24, 2014

Human trafficking has many faces and forms. There’s the pimp enslaving and exploiting young girls in cities across the United States – where an estimated 100,000 girls are trafficked at present. There are the men who buy young boys in Ghana, forcing them into lives of servitude and hard labour, spending long days in flimsy boats in the Lake Volta region, hunched over their fishing lines under a scorching sun.

from Felix Salmon:

Davos pusillanimity watch, LGBT rights edition

By Felix Salmon
January 23, 2014

For an organization which loves to talk about the importance of social responsibility and civil society, it's notable that the WEF has never had a panel on LGBT rights. This year, however, the issue has finally become impossible to avoid. Russia is in the midst of a poisonous campaign against its LGBT citizens; once the Winter Olympics are over, that crackdown is only going to get worse. And in Nigeria, where homosexuality has always been illegal and dangerous, president Goodluck Jonathan -- who is here in Davos -- recently signed into law a brutal new piece of legislation which makes even supporting gay rights punishable by ten years in prison; a round of arrests under the new law has already begun.

from Expert Zone:

Slow change comes to India a year after Delhi gang rape

By Mallika Dutt
December 12, 2013

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

One year ago, a 23-year-old physiotherapy student was raped and murdered. Her story showed the world that women across India are viewed as dispensable, undeserving of full human rights.

from The Great Debate:

Human Rights Day: Still pursuing religious freedom

By Katrina Lantos Swett and Mary Ann Glendon
December 10, 2013

December 10 marks Human Rights Day, the 65th anniversary of the landmark Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), signed by 48 nations -- with just eight abstentions.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

It’s time for Obama to defy Putin

By Nicholas Wapshott
August 5, 2013

Russian president Vladimir Putin’s decision to grant asylum to the NSA leaker Edward Snowden leaves President Obama looking weak. Putin meant it that way. His political base likes him thumbing his nose at the American president and he took a gamble that Obama  would not retaliate over a freelance spy.

from The Great Debate:

Europe’s leaders should boycott Putin’s Olympic ceremony

By Ben Judah
July 19, 2013

In February 2014 the Russian elite will gather in the gleaming super stadiums of Sochi -- governors and oligarchs, police chiefs and “political technologists” -- to thunderously applaud as Vladimir Putin opens his Winter Olympics.

from The Great Debate:

A fragile peace with Taliban if school attacks escalate

By Gordon Brown
June 25, 2013

In the week in which America opened the door for negotiations with the Taliban, three bloody massacres of school children -- shot down simply because they wanted to go to school -- raise grave questions about what kind of peace the Taliban offer.