from The Great Debate:

Keeping a city-by-the-sea from becoming a city in it

By James Sanders and Jesse M. Keenan
July 21, 2014

skyline1908

Virtually every big rainstorm in New York now seems to be accompanied by a flash-flood alert sent to cellphones. And scientists recently reported that a vast section of Antarctica’s ice sheet, now melting, might bring on as much as a 10-foot rise in the world’s sea levels in the coming decades.

from David Rohde:

A year after Sandy, New York’s inequality grows

By David Rohde
October 30, 2013

When Hurricane Sandy engulfed New York a year ago, David Del Valle helped me instead of his mother. Del Valle’s choice was not voluntary.

from The Great Debate:

A year after Sandy, food and fuel supplies are as vulnerable as ever

By Siddhartha Mahanta
October 28, 2013

A year ago, Hurricane Sandy revealed harrowing realities about the basic systems New Yorkers rely on every day. We now know, for example, what happens when fuel supply lines get cut and electricity goes down: mob battles at gas stations and, more terrifying, empty shelves at food stores. Worse, such breakdowns tend to cascade. No power means whatever food is left will rot. No gasoline means delivery trucks can’t restock stores.

from The Great Debate:

Sandy +1: Preparing for the storms ahead

By Bas Jonkman and Mathijs Van Ledden
October 28, 2013

One year ago Tuesday, Hurricane Sandy, perhaps the largest Atlantic storm ever, began its path of destruction in New York City. It ultimately killed almost 300 people across seven countries. In the United States alone, the fierce storm left an estimated $70 billion in damage in its wake, the second-costliest storm in U.S. history.

from MuniLand:

The ‘unintended consequences’ of flood insurance reform

By Cate Long
October 1, 2013

Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy left about $220 billion in total property damages in their wake. Katrina caused approximately $16 billion in flood damages and required the flood insurance program overseer, FEMA, to borrow from the U.S. Treasury to cover insured losses. Losses from Sandy could push FEMA borrowing from the U.S. Treasury to $28 billion when all claims are paid.

from Photographers' Blog:

Ghost town of Superstorm Sandy

April 29, 2013

Breezy Point, New York

By Shannon Stapleton

Driving into the city I was listening to NPR talking about it being the sixth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy.

from The Great Debate:

A politics of ‘unreliable narrators’

By Jennifer Gilmore
April 3, 2013

An unreliable narrator cannot be trusted.

He comes in many guises. There is the delusional unreliable narrator, like Holden Caulfield in The Catcher in the Rye, unaware of how the reader and the other characters perceive him. There is the mad narrator, as in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. There are the unreliable narrators who lie to themselves to make the unreality appear real. Middle-aged professor Humbert Humbert in Lolita famously lies to the jury and to himself,  believing his sexual affair with the drastically under-aged Lolita is not criminal. Yet Vladimir Nabokov, the author, gives a wink to  the reader: We know the protagonist is not being honest with himself.

from The Edgy Optimist:

Climate change doesn’t have to be all bad

By Zachary Karabell
January 11, 2013

This week the National Climate Data Center confirmed what most had long believed: 2012 was the warmest year on record for the United States. Ever. And not just a bit warmer: a full Fahrenheit degree warmer than in 1998, the previous high. In the land of climatology statistics, that is immense. In the understatement of one climate scientist, these findings are “a big deal.”

from The Great Debate:

Rebuilding post-Sandy: Whole greater than parts

By John A. Thomas and Ali Mostashari
January 4, 2013

President Barack Obama asked Congress for more than $60 billion to help repair and rebuild infrastructure damaged by Hurricane Sandy in the Northeast. The House of Representatives finally voted Friday on a small down payment, roughly 10 percent.

from MuniLand:

The epic Senate battle over relief funding for Sandy

By Cate Long
December 26, 2012


New Jersey Governor Chris Christie recently berated Congress for its lack of progress on funding recovery monies for Hurricane Sandy. He made the argument that New Jersey and New York are net contributors to the federal treasury and they therefore deserve the funds that they requested. Yet, it is members of Christie’s own party who are slow-walking the legislation that would authorize spending. Republicans have raised some concerns – among them the amount of the original request and the need to budget for it.