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from Full Focus:

Superstorm Sandy: Before and after

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It's been one year since Superstorm Sandy wreaked havoc on the east coast. A look at before and after pictures of some of the hardest hit areas.

from Environment Forum:

Disasterology 2: hard questions for Breezy Point homeowners a year after Sandy

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For survivors of Superstorm Sandy in the U.S. Northeast, the Sendai tsunami in Japan and the massive earthquake in Chengdu, China, the scars of disaster are still palpable. I’m part of a group of journalists brought together by the East-West Center in Hawaii to see how the people and environments hit by these catastrophes are faring, one year,  two years and five years later. We began our tour on Sept. 29. Here are the other posts in the series:

Breezy Point, Queens, New York:

from Environment Forum:

Disasterology: Storm warnings that work — a lesson from Sandy

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For survivors of Superstorm Sandy in the U.S. Northeast, the Sendai tsunami in Japan and the massive earthquake in Chengdu, China, the scars of disaster are still palpable. I’m part of a group of journalists brought together by the East-West Center in Hawaii to see how the people and environments hit by these catastrophes are faring, one year,  two years and five years later. We began our tour on Sept. 29. Here are the other posts in the series:

Even big storm warnings must get personal if they're going to do any good. Few people know that better than Jason Tuell, director of the Eastern Region of the U.S. National Weather Service, which includes nearly all of the swath that last year's storm Sandy cut when it came ashore last October.

from Full Focus:

Best photos of the year 2012

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WARNING: SOME IMAGES CONTAIN GRAPHIC CONTENT OR NUDITY
The conflict in Syria escalated as the pressure to oust President Bashar al-Assad intensified. Hurricane Sandy struck the U.S. Northeast leaving heavy destruction a week before the country re-elected Barack Obama as President. In this showcase, the photographers offer a behind the scenes account of the images that helped define the year.

from Photographers' Blog:

Staten Island’s stories of Sandy

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Staten Island, New York

By Mike Segar

As New York braced for the arrival of Hurricane Sandy three weeks ago, I was in California for a long-planned personal event. But I wasn’t about to miss what was shaping up to be a major story. I was determined to get back. I found a united flight to Detroit, Michigan, that was still listed as “on-time.” How far a drive would that be to New York? 10 hours? Through a hurricane?... I’ll take it, I thought. Seven hours later I was on the ground in Michigan driving through the night towards New York as winds howled and Sandy was coming ashore. I made it back to a region knocked to its knees by this storm.

The next seven days were a blur of finding and photographing those worst hit by the storm and hunting for gas for vehicles to keep going (not to mention returning home to a house without power, heat or hot water and without my wife and children who had evacuated to Massachusetts). Together Reuters photographers Lucas Jackson, Shannon Stapleton, Brendan McDermid, Keith Bedford, Adrees Latif, Andrew Kelly, Tom Mihalek, Carlo Alegri, Steve Nesius, Chip East, Adam Hunger and myself covered the immediate aftermath of Sandy in countless locations. We documented places and people affected by this massive natural disaster, one of the most destructive ever to hit the Northeast U.S. Our team made amazing pictures throughout and our collective photographic documentation of this disaster speaks for itself.

from Full Focus:

Surviving Sandy

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Photographer Mike Segar went to Staten Island where almost everyone he met had homes destroyed by hurricane Sandy. He found they had compelling stories of loss or survival to tell. The resulting 19 portraits show people who were born and raised in stable, long term communities who are now surrounded by devastated remains of houses that held generations of families. Read Mike's personal account of the project here.

from Stories I’d like to see:

Keeping tabs on the Red Cross; Romney’s transition plans; Obama’s next book

Red Cross donations: Remember September 11

I hope we soon see a lot of coverage of how the Red Cross is using its Hurricane Sandy contributions.

For everyone from Mitt Romney to President Obama to the good-hearted people who raised $23 million through NBC’s telethon last Friday, the Red Cross has become the charity of choice for victims of Sandy – just as it was the default charity after 9/11. But if New York’s last mass disaster is any indication, how the Red Cross uses the money is worth a lot of reporters’ attention.

from Full Focus:

Images of October

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Superstorm Sandy struck the U.S. East Coast leaving a trail of destruction in its wake. Hugo Chavez sealed another term as Venezuela's President and the space shuttle Endeavour took its final voyage through the L.A. streets.

from Alison Frankel:

Can governors bar insurers from charging hurricane deductibles?

On Wednesday night, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo made a startling announcement: Homeowners "will not have to pay" so-called hurricane deductibles when they file insurance claims for damages caused by Sandy. In a follow-up press release Thursday morning, after other governors joined Cuomo in outlawing hurricane deductibles related to Sandy, Cuomo's Department of Financial Services, which regulates insurance companies, said that it had "informed the insurance industry that hurricane deductibles should not be triggered for this storm."

Can Cuomo and his DFS chief, Benjamin Lawsky, do that? Are state governors empowered to determine, by executive fiat, what constitutes a hurricane? The answer to that question, according to three insurance lawyers, is no -- and yes.

from MuniLand:

Can the Port Authority and MTA afford repairs after Sandy?

Hurricane Sandy blasted through New York City and left a swath of wreckage. The cost of repairing the region’s infrastructure hasn’t been totaled yet, but Joe Lhota, head of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), said this:

As of last night, seven subway tunnels under the East River flooded. Metro-North Railroad lost power from 59th Street to Croton-Harmon on the Hudson Line and to New Haven on the New Haven Line. The Long Island Rail Road evacuated its West Side Yards and suffered flooding in one East River tunnel. The Hugh L. Carey Tunnel is flooded from end to end and the Queens Midtown Tunnel also took on water and was closed. Six bus garages were disabled by high water. We are assessing the extent of the damage and beginning the process of recovery.

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