from The Great Debate:

Obama’s immigration implosion

By Keith Koffler
July 9, 2014

U.S. President Barack Obama pauses while speaking about the economy in Denver

President Barack Obama is self-righteously grumbling that, having been stymied by Republicans in Congress, he’ll enact immigration reform on his own by voice vote in the West Wing. That is, via executive decree -- his go-to method of governing given his crushing lack of success on Capitol Hill.

from The Great Debate:

What does Eric Cantor’s loss mean? Gridlock until 2023

By Bill Schneider
June 12, 2014

Cantor and Boehner hold a news conference after a Republican Party caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington

Gridlock is likely to rule the federal government until at least 2023.  Why 2023?  Because it may not be until after the 2020 Census that the Democrats have a good chance of regaining control of the House of Representatives.

from The Great Debate:

Obama’s ultimate indignity: Bush seen as more competent

By Bill Schneider
June 10, 2014

bush-obama

Agreement is not enough.  Performance matters more.

That's why the outlook for Democrats this November looks bleak.  More and more Americans now agree with Democrats on the issues.  But they are increasingly dismayed by President Barack Obama's inability to get results.

from The Great Debate:

Revising Obama’s ‘deporter in chief’ policy

By Herman Schwartz
April 8, 2014

In response to angry complaints from the Latino community about the administration’s deportation policies, President Barack Obama ordered a review in March “to see how to conduct enforcement more humanely.” At the same time, however, White House officials said the administration would neither suspend deportations nor expand the opportunities to stay for illegal immigrants who came to the United States as children.

from The Great Debate:

At the crossroads for immigration reform

By Doris Meissner
February 24, 2014

Always uncertain, House of Representatives action on immigration reform now appears definitively on off mode for 2014.

from Reihan Salam:

Where is the GOP heading on immigration reform?

By Reihan Salam
January 17, 2014

After falling off the radar for months, immigration reform is back. Late last year, Speaker John Boehner hired Rebecca Tallent -- a veteran of Arizona Sen. John McCain’s efforts to offer a path to citizenship to large numbers of unauthorized immigrants -- as one of his senior staffers. That decision strongly suggested that the GOP was on the verge of making a big immigration push. Laura Meckler and Kristina Peterson of the Wall Street Journal report that the Republican leadership is gravitating towards granting unauthorized immigrants provisional legal status that will give them the right to live and work in the United States, and that immigrants granted provisional status will eventually be allowed to apply for a green card.

from Reihan Salam:

The future of Hispanic identity

By Reihan Salam
May 6, 2013

In an interview with ABC News this past weekend, Bill Richardson, the former governor of New Mexico and a veteran of the Clinton White House, shared his thoughts on Sen. Ted Cruz, a Republican from Texas who has been gaining prominence as a staunch, and sometimes strident, conservative voice. Though Richardson acknowledged that Cruz is “articulate,” he accused the Texas senator of having introduced “a measure of incivility in the political process.” When asked if Cruz “represents most Hispanics with his politics,” Richardson replied that because Cruz is anti-immigration, “I don’t think he should be defined as a Hispanic.”

from The Great Debate:

The GOP’s immigration problem

By Bill Schneider
May 1, 2013

Old vaudeville joke:

Man goes to the doctor.  Says he has a pain in his arm.

“Have you ever had this problem before?” the doctor says.

“Yes,” the man answers.

"Well, you got it again.”

Bada-bing.

Now look at the Republicans' immigration problem. Have they had this problem before? Yes. Well, they've got it again.

from Ian Bremmer:

America’s relative rise

By Ian Bremmer
April 19, 2013

Since midway through George W. Bush’s tenure, there’s been a steady hum from the pundit class that America’s best days are behind it. An overreaching foreign policy, rising public debt, and a growing wave of outsourced jobs means that America will soon lose its status as the world’s preeminent power. America was quickly on its way to becoming Rome.

from The Great Debate:

The price of defying your base

By Bill Schneider
April 8, 2013

Defying your base is always risky. It can either bring you down -- or it can make you look stronger.