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from Breakingviews:

Tyremakers’ takeover spat faces high toll

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Apollo Tyres’ spat with its U.S. target could face a high toll. The Indian firm wants to renegotiate its $2.5 billion takeover of Cooper Tire & Rubber following protracted disputes with workers in the United States and China. Cooper has gone to court to force its suitor to pay up. In this fight, a compromise looks like the least bad outcome.

The Indian firm appears to have applied the brakes after underestimating the risks of a backlash by Cooper’s workers in two countries. The situation in China is particularly acute: employees have locked out the management and Cooper’s minority partner is seeking to dissolve the joint venture.

Apollo now admits that resolving the dispute could pile “significant and unprecedented costs” onto what is already a highly-geared transaction. Meanwhile, a U.S. arbitrator has ruled that the Indian company must reach an agreement with workers at two plants in Ohio and Texas in order for that part of the deal to proceed.

from Expert Zone:

SEBI tries to get it REIT again

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

Ease of funding is a key recommendation for the growth and development of the Indian realty sector in the coming decade. New instruments of funding should be allowed into the sector, especially real estate investment trusts (REITs) -- an investment mechanism that buys income-generating real estate assets and passes on the yield to investors.

In this current climate of dwindling investor sentiment and a plunging rupee, there is a need to implement funding options such as REITs for infusing much needed liquidity into the sector. The total REIT market size in the Asia-Pacific region is approximately $205 billion but India has been unable to take advantage of this funding opportunity, mainly because of the lack of an existing regulatory framework.

from India Insight:

Modi, Kejriwal become latest video game characters as developers focus on elections

Politicians are becoming the Super Mario Brothers equivalent for Indian video gamers as 2014 election fever starts to settle over the country.

Software developers have been developing all kinds of new games and apps in recent years as Indians increasingly shift to smartphones of companies such as Samsung, Apple, Micromax and Karbonn. Now politics has crept into the mix.

from The Human Impact:

India’s surrogacy tourism: exploitation or empowerment?

In a globalised world where everything at home is becoming more costly, outsourcing your needs to a third party thousands of miles away for less money makes a lot of sense.

For a country like India, one of the top global destinations for outsourcing, the benefits are tremendous – creating millions of jobs in sectors ranging from garment, software and car manufacturing to call centres and back office operations.

from India Insight:

Woody Allen stops “Blue Jasmine” India release because of anti-tobacco ads

(We have updated this post with a statement from Allen's publicist)

Woody Allen's latest movie "Blue Jasmine" will not debut in India this weekend after the filmmaker objected to anti-tobacco ads that the Indian government requires cinemas to play before and during movies that feature scenes with characters smoking.

Allen refused to make "customisations" in the film to accommodate the ads, which led to distributor PVR Pictures cancelling the release, said two sources familiar with the matter. Both sources declined to comment because they were not authorized to talk about it with journalists.

from India Insight:

Wedding photographers in India beat economic gloom

Rising costs and a slowing economy haven't darkened the mood of wedding photographers in India. More couples than ever are willing to spend thousands of rupees on photo albums, pre-wedding shoots and videos, allowing photographers to take a bigger slice of India's $30 billion weddings business.

“People are willing to spend more money now compared to what they were spending three years back," said Delhi-based photographer Vijay Tonk, who charges around 100,000 rupees for clicking pictures at a two-day function, 10 times more than what he charged in 2010. "It’s a status symbol now to spend money and have good (pictures).”

from India Insight:

Meet Prakash Tilokani, the man who clicks India’s rich and famous

When Prakash Tilokani started taking pictures at the age of 16, he had no clue that one day he would be the man behind the lens at India Inc's weddings.

From selling pictures at 20 rupees (32 cents) each in 1984 to charging at least 300,000 rupees ($4,800) for a day now, it’s been an eventful journey for 47-year-old Tilokani, one of India’s most famous wedding photographers.

from Photographers' Blog:

Birth in India’s “surrogacy capital”

Anand, India

By Mansi Thapliyal

A smooth, modern road in the prosperous Indian state of Gujarat leads to 35-year-old Chimanlal’s small, windowless brick hut that he lives in with his wife, young son and two daughters. Earning 2500 rupees ($38) a month as a driver, Chimanial says it is not enough to feed his children. Only his son goes to school. But in a year’s time, their lives are set to change.

Some 50 kilometers (31 miles) away is the small city of Anand, known as India’s “surrogacy capital”. Chimanlai’s wife is carrying a baby for a Japanese couple in which she will be paid 450,000 rupees ($7,200), an unimaginably large amount of money for a family like theirs.

from India Insight:

Markets this week: Sensex falls 2.6 percent, Jindal Steel slumps 9 percent

After rising for four consecutive weeks, the BSE Sensex fell 2.6 percent in the last five trading sessions, as a surprise repo rate hike by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) on Sept. 20 dampened investor confidence and battered banking shares.

Rate-sensitive sectors were hurt -- the banking index and the realty index lost over 7 percent in the week. YES Bank fell 14.5 percent, SBI lost 6 percent while shares of DLF slumped 13 percent.

from India Insight:

Social media not a game changer in 2014 elections

By Aditya Kalra and David Lalmalsawma

Political parties in India are relying more on social media ahead of the 2014 election as a way of increasing voter support, even though politicians in general do not expect such efforts to significantly influence election results.

Parties are trying to ride the digital wave by conducting workshops to teach leaders and foot soldiers how to improve engagement on websites such as Facebook and Twitter.

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