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from Global Investing:

Revitalised West knocks Brazil, Russia off global growth Top-30

By Shadi Bushra

Yet another sign of the growth convergence between developed and emerging markets. Two  of the "BRIC' countries have dropped out of the Top-30 in a growth index compiled by political risk consultancy Maplecroft, while several Western powerhouses have nudged their way onto the list.

Maplecroft's 2014 Growth Opportunities Atlas showed that Brazil and Russia -- the B and R of the BRIC bloc -- had dropped 26 and 41 places, respectively - due to slow economic reforms and diversification.  The United States, Australia and Germany meanwhile broke into the top 30 on the  index, which evaluates 173 countries on their growth prospects over the next 20 years.

The study's results are indicative of the broader pattern this year of an emerging markets slowdown after years of robust growth fuelled by cheap money from the West and a decade of booming trade. But the two other BRIC countries -- India and China -- have retained their top spots, albeit with lower absolute scores. And India overtook China for first place due to its "catch-up growth potential,"  Maplecroft's report said.

The index also highlights a view that has been gaining increasing currency in recent times -- that the term emerging markets is a actually a convenient catch-all phrase that masks the diversity within the group it supposedly describes. So although the report disparages Brazil and Russia's failure to use a decade-long commodity boom to invest in long-term growth, it offers Indonesia (3rd), Turkey (13th) and Nigeria (18th) as possible alternatives.

from Expert Zone:

India Markets Weekahead: Results of state elections a key driver

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

Markets had been on a roller-coaster ride but closed weak for the third week in the row with the Nifty in the 5950-6000 range providing support.

A hint from the U.S. Federal Reserve on tapering its bond-buying programme was enough to spook the markets. Though this is expected in the first quarter of the new year, it remains to be seen whether chairman-elect Janet Yellen's dovish stance would postpone it further.

from India Insight:

Stan Lee bets on India for latest superhero success

Legendary comic book writer Stan Lee has someone in mind that he would like to popularize as much as his 1960s co-creation "Spider-Man": "Chakra, the invincible!" said the 90-year-old Lee, his voice booming with the excitement of a freshman working on his first project.

The American comics veteran, who collaborated on the creation of superheroes such as Thor and Iron Man, helped create an Indian superhero in partnership with Graphic India. Chakra will make his debut as an animated feature on Cartoon Network in India later this month.

from India Insight:

Indian superhero should have been created long time ago – Stan Lee

Best known for his comic book superheroes that have been adapted into big Hollywood movies, veteran American writer Stan Lee is set to make his India debut.

In partnership with Graphic India, Lee has created a TV animation feature called "Chakra - the Invincible." The teenaged superhero is based in Mumbai and taps into ancient Indian Hindu beliefs to gather his superpowers.

from India Insight:

Sharad Devarajan has big plans for Stan Lee’s Indian debut ‘Chakra’

Sharad Devarajan is no stranger to the animation and comic book scene in India. He was responsible for bringing DC Comics, Marvel and the publishing activities of Cartoon Network to the country, and worked with Marvel on an Indian avatar of the Spider-Man in 2004, the first "trans-creation." Devarajan is also launching a series on Bollywood superhero franchise Krrish.

He heads a U.S.-based digital entertainment company, Liquid Comics, which creates original graphic and animation content for various media. The company’s Indian arm, Graphic India, worked with Stan Lee's POW! Entertainment and developed the American cartoonist’s first Indian superhero, Chakra.

from Left field:

Tendulkar’s retirement a boon not a bane

While Sachin Tendulkar’s retirement may have been looked upon as the saddest chapter in Indian cricket, the fact remains that his exit can only work to the benefit of MS Dhoni’s emerging Test side.

There is no doubt about Tendulkar’s contribution to Indian cricket but as statistics show his impact was on the decline, more so in the last two years.

from Left field:

Importance of being Sachin Tendulkar

For 24 years Sachin had been India's happiness index.

If a common man, while wading through the struggles of his daily life, smiled, it was mostly when Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar took guard for India. All that has come to an end with his retirement.

India may never find another sporting icon who singularly succeeded in making the nation forget its faults - a unifying factor of rare stature. No player, in contemporary cricket, has evoked spells of pure joy with his craft and conduct for so long - 24 years. Life, for the nation of a billion people, will go on but never be the same again.

from The Great Debate:

Fighting for democracy in South Asia

For the first time in post-colonial history, all of the countries of South Asia are democracies.

From Bhutan to Bangladesh, Kabul to Kathmandu, democratic institutions are taking hold and giving people a voice in how they are governed. But these historic gains could be short-lived if troubling trends in some impending political transitions go unchecked.

from India Insight:

Doctors seek home-grown deterrents in India’s diabetes fight

From yoga and fenugreek powder to mobile messaging, diabetes experts in India are searching for local and cost-effective methods to fend off the disease as it affects ever more numbers of people in the country.

India is home to more than 60 million diabetics, a number that the Research Society for the Study of Diabetes in India (RSSDI) estimates will cross 85 million in 2030, or nearly 8 percent of the country’s population today.

from India Insight:

Real estate offers lure some Indian buyers

For around a year, Girish Kale was flirting with the idea of buying his dream house. His budget of 3.5 million to 4 million rupees ($56,000-$64,000) wasn't going to work for Mumbai, where the kind of house the auto industry professional wanted would cost upwards of 10 million rupees.

Kale, who currently lives in a rented flat in Kandivali suburb, turned instead to Pune, a university city 150 kilometres away, with a plan to opt for a so-called 80:20 payment scheme. Such schemes allow the buyer to pay 20 percent of the property’s cost initially and the remaining amount on possession after construction.

However, when the Reserve Bank of India issued a directive on Sept. 4 restricting some of these schemes, Kale’s broker put them on the back burner. The central bank’s directive might have disappointed buyers, but some still want to invest in property.

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