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from Left field:

Importance of being Sachin Tendulkar

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For 24 years Sachin had been India's happiness index.

If a common man, while wading through the struggles of his daily life, smiled, it was mostly when Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar took guard for India. All that has come to an end with his retirement.

India may never find another sporting icon who singularly succeeded in making the nation forget its faults - a unifying factor of rare stature. No player, in contemporary cricket, has evoked spells of pure joy with his craft and conduct for so long - 24 years. Life, for the nation of a billion people, will go on but never be the same again.

India, in 1989, was at a crossroads. Decades of Congress rule had come to an end. New hopes and new horizons seemed possible as V.P. Singh took over as the prime minister.

Team India was also on a similar path. Sunil Gavaskar had retired; Kapil Dev and Dilip Vengsarkar were past their prime. On Nov. 15, a 16-year-old Sachin joined the ranks to face the world's most fearsome bowling attack of Imran Khan, Wasim Akram, Waqar Younus and Abdul Qadir.

from The Great Debate:

Fighting for democracy in South Asia

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For the first time in post-colonial history, all of the countries of South Asia are democracies.

From Bhutan to Bangladesh, Kabul to Kathmandu, democratic institutions are taking hold and giving people a voice in how they are governed. But these historic gains could be short-lived if troubling trends in some impending political transitions go unchecked.

from India Insight:

Doctors seek home-grown deterrents in India’s diabetes fight

From yoga and fenugreek powder to mobile messaging, diabetes experts in India are searching for local and cost-effective methods to fend off the disease as it affects ever more numbers of people in the country.

India is home to more than 60 million diabetics, a number that the Research Society for the Study of Diabetes in India (RSSDI) estimates will cross 85 million in 2030, or nearly 8 percent of the country’s population today.

from India Insight:

Real estate offers lure some Indian buyers

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For around a year, Girish Kale was flirting with the idea of buying his dream house. His budget of 3.5 million to 4 million rupees ($56,000-$64,000) wasn't going to work for Mumbai, where the kind of house the auto industry professional wanted would cost upwards of 10 million rupees.

Kale, who currently lives in a rented flat in Kandivali suburb, turned instead to Pune, a university city 150 kilometres away, with a plan to opt for a so-called 80:20 payment scheme. Such schemes allow the buyer to pay 20 percent of the property’s cost initially and the remaining amount on possession after construction.

However, when the Reserve Bank of India issued a directive on Sept. 4 restricting some of these schemes, Kale’s broker put them on the back burner. The central bank’s directive might have disappointed buyers, but some still want to invest in property.

from Expert Zone:

Mall developers take to revenue-sharing to woo retailers

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

Over the last five to seven years, the retail segment in India has evolved towards a more organized pricing structure. After the real estate boom of 2005-06, when property prices increased to as much as 40 percent of a retailer’s operating costs, developers seemed more willing to share the business risk. They moved from a per-square-foot rental model to versions of the minimum guarantee and/or the revenue share model. Most investment-grade properties in major cities now follow this model, unlike shopping centres in smaller cities.

In the original model, rentals varied depending on the store and location. But with increased brand awareness and rising vacancies, developers saw the need for a customized tenancy mix, adopting efficient mall management techniques while protecting retailer interests to maximize their own earnings.

from The Human Impact:

Why India’s Mars mission matters, despite poverty

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There has been much fanfare over the launch of India's first rocket to Mars - a mission which, if successful, will position the Asian nation as a major player in the global space race.

For days last week, local television news channels broadcast constant updates as the Indian Space Research Organisation readied to send "Mangalyaan" – the “Mars-craft” – to the red planet.

from India Insight:

Markets this week: Sensex loses 2.7 percent, SBI falls 7.5 percent

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Hurt by profit-taking in blue chips, the BSE Sensex posted its worst weekly decline since August as it lost 2.7 percent in a holiday-truncated week.

On Thursday, shares were hurt after ratings agency Standard & Poor's said it will review the rating of Asia’s third-largest economy after the new government lays out its policy agenda next year. The agency’s outlook on rating remains negative.

from India Insight:

Indian women get a new look, with some help from Pernia Qureshi

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In a country where styling has not always been recognized as a worthy craft, Pernia Qureshi has put her profession at the forefront of Bollywood fashion.

Qureshi styled actress Sonam Kapoor for 2010's "Aisha", ushering in trendy outfits paired with designer handbags that overshadowed the film, a modern-day take on Jane Austen's "Emma".

from India Insight:

Equity mutual funds record best monthly performance since Jan 2012

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India's diversified equity funds posted their best monthly performance since Jan 2012 as the benchmark Sensex scaled record highs in October, with bets on sectors such as banking and capital goods boosting mutual fund returns.

Such schemes, which form the largest category of equity funds in India by number and assets, rose 9.2 percent on average, mirroring returns on the 30-share BSE Sensex, data from fund tracker Lipper, a Thomson Reuters company, showed.

from India Insight:

India’s mission to Mars at a glance

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India's Mars Orbiter Mission, the country's first interplanetary foray, is billed as a pathfinder to test technologies to fly to orbit and communicate from the Red Planet. It follows India's successful 2008-2009 Chandrayaan-1 moon probe, which discovered water molecules in the lunar soil.

Here are some facts about the project:

    One of the objectives is to develop the technologies required for design, planning, management and operations of an interplanetary mission. The mission aims to explore Mars surface features, morphology, mineralogy and search for methane in the Martian atmosphere using indigenous scientific instruments. Payloads on the satellite include instruments for studying the atmosphere, particle environment and surface imaging. These include the Lyman Alpha Photometer, a methane sensor, a composition analyser, a camera and an imaging spectrometer. The Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle will launch the 1,337 kg Mars Orbiter satellite as part of its 25th mission. The satellite is scheduled to reach the Mars orbit in September 2014 and is designed to circle the Red Planet in an elliptical orbit of 366 km X 80,000 km. The total cost of the Mars mission is $73 million.

Source: Reuters, Indian Space Research Organisation. More info here

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