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from The Human Impact:

Election day, a time of hope – and concern – over Indonesian women’s rights

Photo

Tri Widayati is the first woman in her family - and her village too, she thinks - to find employment. At 18, soon after graduating from high school, she left her small village in Klaten regency in Central Java for Bekasi, a satellite town of the capital, Jakarta.

“Every woman in my village, once they get married, they just stay at home and look after the children,” including her mother and sister, Tri said.

“I wanted to come here for self improvement. If I had just stayed in the village it would be the same old life and there’d be no progress,” she said, sitting in the office of a workers’ union in Bekasi.

It was the end of March and I was in Bekasi to speak to female migrant workers employed in hundreds of factories here. I wanted to get a sense of how they live and work, what they thought of the imminent parliamentary elections and where they see Indonesia heading on women’s rights.

from Global Investing:

Buying back into emerging markets

After almost a year of selling emerging markets, investors seem to be returning in force. The latest to turn positive on the asset class is asset and wealth manager Pictet Group (AUM: 265 billion pounds) which said on Tuesday its asset management division (clarifies division of Pictet) was starting to build positions on emerging equities and local currency debt. It has an overweight position on the latter for the first time since it went underweight last July.

Local emerging debt has been out of favour with investors because of how volatile currencies have been since last May, For an investor who is funding an emerging market investments from dollars or euros, a fast-falling rand can wipe out any gains he makes on a South African bond. But the rand and its peers such as the Turkish lira, Indian rupee, Indonesian rupiah and Brazilan real -- at the forefront of last year's selloff --  have stabilised from the lows hit in recent months.  According to Pictet Asset Management:

from Photographers' Blog:

From the White House to the Mad House

Photo

Bali, Indonesia

By Jason Reed

Just a couple of months ago I was swirling in a perpetual bubble, a privileged circle of photographers whose job it is to photograph one man – the President of the United States.

I did it for ten years and mostly enjoyed every minute. Over that period of time there comes a predictable familiarity to the role, in which you can pre-write all your captions hours and sometimes days in advance and plan your coverage down to the last detail. It is a safe and cosy existence. Due to the nature of the subject, it needs to be.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Behind the wave of market anxiety

What has caused the sudden anxiety attack that overwhelmed financial markets after the New Year? We may find out the answer at 8.30 on Friday morning, Eastern Standard Time.

Almost all agree that the market turmoil has been linked to alarming events in several emerging economies -- including Turkey, Thailand, Argentina and Ukraine -- that has spilled over into concerns about more important economies, such as China, Russia, South Africa, Indonesia and Brazil.

from Global Investing:

It’s not end of the world at the Fragile Five

Despite all the doom and gloom surrounding capital-hungry Fragile Five countries, real money managers have not abandoned the ship at all.

Aberdeen Asset Management has overweight equity positions in Indonesia, India, Turkey and Brazil -- that's already 4 of the five countries that have come under market pressure because of their funding deficits.  The fund is also positive on Thailand and the Philippines.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

Better year for commodities?

We quizzed Gavin Wendt, Founding Director & Senior Resource Analyst at MineLife, on the impact of Fed-taper on commodities, base metals, precious metals, nat-gas, Indonesia's ban on mineral exports and China.

Gavin is positive on soft commodities as hard commodities in the medium to longer-term. "The world's population is 7 billion and growing - and demand for energy, hard and soft commodities will only grow," he said.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

Better year for commodities?

We quizzed Gavin Wendt, Founding Director & Senior Resource Analyst at MineLife, on the impact of Fed-taper on commodities, base metals, precious metals, nat-gas, Indonesia's ban on mineral exports and China.

Gavin is positive on soft commodities as hard commodities in the medium to longer-term. "The world's population is 7 billion and growing - and demand for energy, hard and soft commodities will only grow," he said.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

Better year for commodities?

We quizzed Gavin Wendt, Founding Director & Senior Resource Analyst at MineLife, on the impact of Fed-taper on commodities, base metals, precious metals, nat-gas, Indonesia's ban on mineral exports and China.

Gavin is positive on soft commodities as hard commodities in the medium to longer-term. "The world's population is 7 billion and growing - and demand for energy, hard and soft commodities will only grow," he said.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

Better year for commodities?

We quizzed Gavin Wendt, Founding Director & Senior Resource Analyst at MineLife, on the impact of Fed-taper on commodities, base metals, precious metals, nat-gas, Indonesia's ban on mineral exports and China.

Gavin is positive on soft commodities as hard commodities in the medium to longer-term. "The world's population is 7 billion and growing - and demand for energy, hard and soft commodities will only grow," he said.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

Better year for commodities?

We quizzed Gavin Wendt, Founding Director & Senior Resource Analyst at MineLife, on the impact of Fed-taper on commodities, base metals, precious metals, nat-gas, Indonesia's ban on mineral exports and China.

Gavin is positive on soft commodities as hard commodities in the medium to longer-term. "The world's population is 7 billion and growing - and demand for energy, hard and soft commodities will only grow," he said.

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