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from MacroScope:

A Fed dove does Broadway

Earlier this month, the chief of the Minneapolis Fed gave an extraordinary speech http://bit.ly/1qUTucn in which he called for higher inflation.

That's right -- you and me, paying more for goods and services. Why would a central banker want something like that?

To Minneapolis Fed President Narayana Kocherlakota, policymakers who worry about too-high inflation are caught in a time warp from the 1970s, when price rises were in the double digits and President Gerald Ford was organizing the "Whip Inflation Now" campaign, or WIN for short.

The White House at the time commissioned Broadway hit maker Meredith Willson to write a theme song. Kocherlakota quotes the lyrics:

from Ann Saphir:

Fed’s Kocherlakota does Broadway

Earlier this month, the chief of the Minneapolis Fed gave an extraordinary speech http://bit.ly/1qUTucn in which he called for higher inflation.

That's right -- you and me, paying more for goods and services. Why would a central banker want something like that?

from Ann Saphir:

A Fed dove does Broadway

Earlier this month, the chief of the Minneapolis Fed gave an extraordinary speech http://bit.ly/1qUTucn in which he called for higher inflation.

That's right -- you and me, paying more for goods and services. Why would a central banker want something like that?

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – European Deflation

Never say the Europeans aren’t cautious. The dollar has been on a roll of late, in part because of the market’s growing expectation for more stimulus from the European Central Bank before long that would include some kind of larger-scale quantitative easing program after a speech last week from Mario Draghi that European markets seem to still be reacting to several days later. Reuters, however, reported that the ECB isn’t quite likely to do move quite so fast (heard this one before) and that took some of the wind out of the dollar’s sails and boosted the euro a bit.

Some of the move in the euro will depend on the trend in European yields, where everything is going down – German Bunds continue to make their way rapidly toward zero, and Bund futures remain in an overwhelming bullish trend, per data from Bank of America-Merrill Lynch. Analysts there also anticipate the dollar is going to experience some kind of medium-term correction – but remains in rally mode otherwise. There’s a headwind there for equities from that – rising greenback makes U.S. goods more expensive, but the gains are still only in earlier stages, and haven’t pushed into territory that would otherwise indicate surprising strength that we haven’t seen in some time.

from Breakingviews:

ECB deserves to lose market’s inflation confidence

By Swaha Pattanaik

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

The case of the euro zone’s vanishing inflation rate has so far stumped European Central Bank President Mario Draghi. Quite rightly, investors’ faith in his ability to do anything about the problem is also evaporating.

from Expert Zone:

India Markets Weekahead: ‎Tough for the Nifty to break out of its range

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The Nifty continued its upward trajectory to close at a two-week high of 7,792 in a holiday-truncated week. However, this optimism was not reflected in the broader market, especially the mid caps and small caps.

Among the sectors, public sector banks, realty, infrastructure and capital goods, which led the rally earlier, have underperformed in the last few weeks whereas defensives such as FMCG, pharma and IT stood out, an irony when markets are close to a record high.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

A very German problem for the ECB

The clock is ticking down to the European Central Bank’s policy meeting tomorrow and markets are waiting to see what the bank’s president, Mario Draghi, will say about the state of the regional economy, especially since euro zone inflation fell in July to its lowest level since the height of the financial crisis five years ago.

Earlier today, Lorcan Roche Kelly, one of the most prolific financial-market tweeters who has nearly 14,000 followers, joined us in the forum to give us an idea of what to expect from the ECB and said at most, Draghi will reiterate the central bank’s latest acronyms - TLTRO (Target Long Term Refinancing Operation) and Annual Quarterly Review (AQR) - but is unlikely to spring any new ones on the markets.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – The economic state of things

The jobs report takes a bit of heat off of Thursday’s selloff, which was predicated in part on some nonsense out of Europe and more importantly some kind of growing consensus that the economy is getting hot enough that it might force the Federal Reserve to start raising rates a bit earlier than expected, given a sharp and unexpected rise in the employment cost index on Thursday. And while it’s fair to suggest the stock market has gotten a bit ahead of itself when the Fed is rapidly moving toward the end of its stimulus policies, it’s also possible that stocks have gotten ahead of themselves for a far more prosaic reason – the economy isn’t strong enough to support the kind of valuations we’re seeing in equities right now.

That’s not to say we’ve got bubbles all over the place in stocks – they’re pretty few and far between – but credit standards in various places have loosened, and if the Fed starts raising rates we’re going to see a pretty quick reversal of that before long. There are significant signs of concern emerging in places like the high yield market, which has dropped off sharply in recent days, particularly among the weakest credits, and the housing and auto markets, which are better leading indicators than the jobs data, also suggest that the slack credit standards may end up hitting a wall before long.

from MacroScope:

Another month, another downside surprise on euro zone inflation

sale signsNobody except a born pessimist ever expects a bad situation to get incrementally worse.

But the relentless downward trajectory of inflation in the euro zone has got plenty of economists sounding unconvinced that the situation will turn around any time soon.

from MacroScope:

Euro zone inflation to fall further?

draghi.jpg

Euro zone inflation is the big figure of the day. The consensus forecast is it for hold at a paltry 0.5 percent. Germany’s rate came in as predicted at 0.8 percent on Wednesday but Spain’s was well short at -0.3 percent. So there is clearly a risk that inflation for the currency bloc as a whole falls even further.

The Bundesbank has taken the unusual step of saying wage deals in Germany are too low and more hefty rises should be forthcoming, a sign of its concern about deflation. But the bar to printing money remains high and the European Central Bank certainly won’t act when it meets next week. It is still waiting to see what impact its June interest rate cuts and offer of more long-term cheap money to banks might have.

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