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from Global Investing:

Emerging markets; turning a corner

Emerging markets have been attracting healthy investment flows into their stock and bond markets for much of this year and now data compiled by consultancy CrossBorder Capital shows the sector may be on the cusp of decisively turning the corner.

CrossBorder and its managing director Michael Howell say their Global Liquidity Index (GLI) -- a measure of money flows through world markets -- showed the sharpest improvement in almost three years in June across emerging markets. That was down to substantially looser policy by central banks in India, China and others that Howell says has moved these economies "into a rebound phase".

This is important because the GLI, which has been around since the 1980s, has been a fairly accurate leading indicator, leading asset prices by 6-9 months and future economic activity by 12-15 months, Howell says:

Weak liquidity has been the key reason why EM shares have underperformed for so long. More liquidity may now allow EM markets to catch up.

from MacroScope:

Safe-haven Canada

The European crisis has thinned the ranks of countries considered safe-havens for investors, and may be contributing to an increase in foreign ownership of Canadian assets. Canada, whose comparatively robust banking sector helped it weather the 2008-2009 financial crisis better than many peers, saw capital inflows in July that helped reverse a June decline, according to the latest figures.

Foreigners resumed their net purchases of Canadian securities in July, taking on C$6.67 billion ($6.88 billion) after having reduced their holdings by C$7.76 billion in June, Statistics Canada said on Monday. Canadian authorities have said foreign investors view Canada as a safe haven. So far this year foreigners have made C$41.23 billion in net purchases, a substantial amount though down from C$54.31 billion seen in the first seven months of 2011.

from MacroScope:

Foreign investors still buying American

Overseas investors have yet to sour towards U.S. assets despite high government debt levels, according the latest figures on capital flows.

Including short-dated assets such as bills, foreigners snapped up $107.7 billion in U.S. securities in February, following a downwardly revised $3.1 billion inflow for January. At the same time, the United States attracted a net long-term capital inflow of just $10.1 billion in February after drawing an upwardly revised $102.4 billion in the first month of 2012.

from Funds Hub:

Morning line-up

News and views on the hedge fund sector from Reuters and elsewhere:

tea.jpgEx-Centaurus HK chief starts new fund - Bloomberg

Reprieve for Cohen? - Reuters

Hedgies' impact on energy trading - Commodities Now

Investors pour in billions - Reuters

Citi taps the UCITS rush - FINAlternatives

from Funds Hub:

Back in rude health

The hedge fund industry, it seems, has come out of intensive care and is doing laps around the block again.

After last year's turmoil, funds are seeing assets flow back, performance pick up and confidence return.

from Funds Hub:

Have hedge fund flows turned the corner?

waterThe global hedge fund industry has recovered from last fall's lows, thanks to bubbly markets, but investors this year continued to yank out their cash. Until now.

HedgeFund.net, which tracks industry performance and trends, in a report released this week estimated that total hedge fund assets rose more than 2.5 percent, or $47 billion, to reach $1.89 trillion at the end of last month. Nearly half that growth came from net inflows of $19.6 billion. 

from Funds Hub:

GLG pulls in punters

GLG Partners has confirmed positive client money flows are back on the agenda, reporting net sales of $2.2 billion in the second quarter in a trading statement which sparked a rise in the share price. The company also reckons strong performance among its funds has set the scene for more to come.

rtrql1xBarclays Capital last month predicted net inflows could reach as much as $50 billion in 2009, and GLG shows the numbers are starting to come through to support that theory. Of about 300 investors, BarCap found that some 80 percent were expecting to move back out of cash and into hedge funds this year.

from Funds Hub:

Getting better all the time

Hedge fund firms are once again positioning their businesses for better times ahead -- lending further weight to anecdotal evidence that investors are turning back to the industry.

rtr1z93xToday brings news that Lansdowne Partners has stopped taking money into its flagship $8 billion UK Equities fund, having recently accepted new cash following $1.2 billion of investor redemptions.

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