from The Great Debate:

Post Iraq, U.S. must rely on covert action

By Jack Devine
June 13, 2014

devine -- afghan-militia-1024x736

Covert actions are now crucial to U.S. foreign policy. After the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, Washington should rely more on CIA-driven covert operations and less on military force in the world’s hotspots.

from The Great Debate:

Senate must rein in the NSA

By Elizabeth Goitein
June 2, 2014

An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

The House of Representatives seemed poised last month to rein in the government's ability to spy on its citizens by prohibiting the bulk collection of Americans' telephone records. On the eve of the vote, however, the Obama administration and House leadership intervened. In secret negotiations, they took a carving knife to the bill, removing key privacy protections.

from Jack Shafer:

The top spook’s stupid gag order

By Jack Shafer
April 21, 2014

The nation's top spy has prohibited all of his spies from talking with reporters about "intelligence-related information" unless officially authorized to speak. Intelligence Community Directive 119, signed by Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper last month and made public Monday in a report by Steven Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists, threatens to reduce the flow of information from the national security establishment to the press -- and hence the public.

from The Great Debate:

NSA revelations: Fallout can serve our nation

By Ben FitzGerald and Robert Butler
December 18, 2013

The fallout from the Edward Snowden revelations continues to snowball. With each disclosure, allies, businesses and influential authors call for reform. There is ever growing pressure on the Obama administration to respond and quell these concerns before permanent damage is done.

from The Great Debate:

Broaden the German-U.S. dialogue about snooping

By Jane Harman and Volker Perthes
November 21, 2013

Germans are not naive: They know that states spy, and that attempts to listen in to Chancellor Angela Merkel's conversations were to be expected. But they didn’t expect that the United States would do this, for a decade.

from The Great Debate:

The danger in shutting down national security

By Mieke Eoyang and Ben Freeman
October 3, 2013

The nation awoke Tuesday to find much of the federal government closed for business. The Republican-controlled House of Representatives had refused to fund essential government functions until the rest of Congress and President Barack Obama agreed to reverse a healthcare law passed three years ago and deemed constitutional by the Supreme Court. By doing so, they put reversing healthcare reform ahead of protecting the nation.

from The Great Debate:

Is the intelligence on Syria different this time?

By David Wise
September 9, 2013

The long shadow of the faulty, hyped intelligence in the run-up to the war in Iraq has posed a huge barrier to President Barack Obama's efforts to win public and congressional support for a limited missile strike against Syria.

from The Great Debate:

NSA: Listening to everyone — except oversight

By James Bamford
August 27, 2013

ILLUSTRATION: Matt Mahurin

For 35 years the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court has been the judicial equivalent of a stellar black hole -- everything goes in but nothing is allowed to escape.

from The Great Debate:

The Navy’s underwater eavesdropper

By David Axe
July 19, 2013

No, the U.S. Navy is probably not using a multi-billion dollar submarine to listen in on your phone calls and emails on behalf of the National Security Agency.

from The Great Debate:

Building America’s secret surveillance state

By James Bamford
June 10, 2013

ILLUSTRATION: Matt Mahurin

“God we trust,” goes an old National Security Agency joke.  “All others we monitor.