from FaithWorld:

PAPA DIXIT: preaching family values and interfaith in Nazareth

May 14, 2009

Pope Benedict spent Thursday in Nazareth, the town where Jesus grew up in what is now the northern part of Israel. With no pressing political issues there, his sermon and speeches had a more religious focus than some recent ones.

from FaithWorld:

PAPA DIXIT: to Muslims, rabbis, bishops, faithful in Jerusalem

May 12, 2009

Four speeches today to four quite different audiences. Pope Benedict first addressed Muslim religious leaders (see our separate blog on that) and then Israel's two grand rabbis. Both were about interfaith dialogue, but he was encouraging the Muslims to pursue it while he reassured the Jews the Catholic Church remained committed to it. He then addressed the Catholic bishops of the Holy Land and a Mass in the Valley of Josephat, just east of Jerusalem's old city. At that Mass, the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, Archbishop Fouad Twal, delivered an interesting address comparing the Palestinians and Israelis to Jesus in his agony in the nearby Garden of Gethsemane and the international community to the three Apostles who slept during that crucial period in Christ's passion (see our separate blog on that).

from FaithWorld:

At Dome of Rock, Benedict uses Muslims’ argument to Muslims

May 12, 2009

pope-dome-outsideAt Jerusalem's Dome of the Rock, part of the Temple Mount/Noble Sanctuary complex including Islam's third-holiest mosque Al-Aqsa, Pope Benedict urged Palestinian Muslim leaders to pursue interfaith cooperation by using an argument that other Muslims have been using to engage Christians -- including himself -- in dialogue. The need for interfaith dialogue is emerging as one of the two most consistent themes of Benedict's speeches during his current Middle East tour (the other being the link between faith and reason). Appeals like this risk being empty phrases, but he has given some new twists that make them stand out.

from FaithWorld:

Popes at Yad Vashem: comparing John Paul and Benedict

May 11, 2009

Pope Benedict's speech at the Yad Vashem today took a different approach from the speech his predecessor Pope John Paul delivered at the Holocaust memorial on 23 March 2000. Polish-born John Paul mentioned the Nazis twice while Benedict, a German, did not. John Paul recalled the fate of his Jewish neighbours; Benedict offered no personal wartime memories. John Paul spoke in a broader perspective, mentioning godless ideology, anti-Semitism, the "just" Gentiles who saved Jews and the shared spiritual heritage of Christians and Jews. Benedict took a narrower approach, meditating on the significance of names and speaking only of the Catholic Church rather than Christians in general.

from FaithWorld:

PAPA DIXIT: Sermon at Amman Mass, at Jesus baptism site

May 10, 2009

Sunday was a lighter program, with Pope Benedict celebrating an open-air Mass at Amman's International Stadium in the morning and then visiting the Bethany beyond the Jordan site where Jesus was said to have been baptised. Here are excerpts from his speeches.

from FaithWorld:

PAPA DIXIT:Pope’s words at mosque, Moses mount, Madaba

May 9, 2009

pope-ghaziPope Benedict's long-awaited address to Muslims at the King Hussein bin Talal Mosque topped the day's list of speeches. It dominated our news coverage today. He also spoke at Mount Nebo, where the Bible says Moses glimpsed the Promised Land before dying, and at a ceremony to bless the cornerstone of a Catholic university being built in Madaba. The mosque and Madaba speeches were classic Ratzinger, with some of his trademark theological and philosophical arguments. If he had delivered the mosque speech at Regensburg, there might never have been a "Regensburg." Benedict ended the day with a short sermon at vespers in the Greek-Melkite Cathedral of Saint George.

from FaithWorld:

Benedict’s “anti-Regensburg” speech in Amman mosque

May 9, 2009

pope-speech
(Photo: Benedict speaks at King Hussein bin Talal Mosque, 9 May 2009/Ahmed Jadallah)

If Pope Benedict had delivered today's speech on Christian-Muslim cooperation back in Regensburg two years ago, there might never have been a "Regensburg." The name of the tranquil Bavarian university town where Benedict once taught theology has become shorthand for how a man as intelligent as the pope can commit an enormous interfaith gaffe. His long-awaited address today in the King Hussein bin Talal Mosque, Jordan's magestic state mosque on a hilltop in western Amman, was an eloquent call for Christians and Muslims to work together to defend the role of faith in modern life. Rather than hinting that Islam was irrational, as Muslims understood him to say in Regensburg, he called human reason "God's gift" to all. Christians and Muslims should work together using their faith and reason to promote the common good in their societies, he said, and oppose political manipulation of any faith.The speech clearly sought common ground with its Muslim audience. It started off linking the massive pale limestone mosque to other places of worship that "stand out like jewels across the earth’s surface" and "through the centuries ... have drawn men and women into their sacred space to pause, to pray, to acknowledge the presence of the Almighty, and to recognize that we are all his creatures."Benedict described the increasingly frequent argument that religion caused tensions and division in the world as worrying both to Christian and to Muslim believers. "The need for believers to be true to their principles and beliefs is felt all the more keenly," he said in the speech in English. "Muslims and Christians, precisely because of the burden of our common history so often marked by misunderstanding, must today strive to be known and recognized as worshipers of God faithful to prayer, eager to uphold and live by the Almighty’s decrees, merciful and compassionate, consistent in bearing witness to all that is true and good, and ever mindful of the common origin and dignity of all human persons, who remain at the apex of God’s creative design for the world and for history."After praising Jordan's work promoting interfaith dialogue, he said the greater reciprocal knowledge both sides had gained through dialogue "should prompt Christians and Muslims to probe even more deeply the essential relationship between God and his world so that together we may strive to ensure that society resonates in harmony with the divine order."pope-minaretToday I wish to refer to a task which ... I firmly believe Christians and Muslims can embrace... That task is the challenge to cultivate for the good, in the context of faith and truth, the vast potential of human reason... As believers in the one God, we know that human reason is itself God’s gift and that it soars to its highest plane when suffused with the light of God’s truth. In fact, when human reason humbly allows itself to be purified by faith, it is far from weakened; rather, it is strengthened to resist presumption and to reach beyond its own limitations. In this way, human reason is emboldened to pursue its noble purpose of serving mankind, giving expression to our deepest common aspirations and extending, rather than manipulating or confining, public debate."
(Photo: Benedict with Prince Ghazi (in robes) outside the mosque, 9 May 2009/Ahmed Jadallah)

So has Benedict "made up for Regensburg" or managed to trump it with this speech? His critics here naturally didn't think so. Sheikh Hamza Mansour, a leading Islamist scholar and politician, told my colleague Suleiman al-Khalidi that the pope had "not sent any message to Muslims that expresses his respect for Islam or its religious symbols starting with the Prophet." Benedict had spoken on Friday about his deep respect for Muslims, but not specifically for Islam."I wouldn't want to read too much into selecting a particular word or not," Ibrahim Kalin, a Turkish Islamic scholar and spokesman for the Common Word group of Muslim intellectuals promoting dialogue with Christians, told me by phone from Ankara. The speech was "very positive," he said. "He said many other things in this speech. He said Christians and Muslims pray to the same God. That's an expression of enormous commonality. I would go by the context of what hes saying. It's a long way from Regensburg speech."Kalin, who also teaches at Georgetown University in Washington, said this speech couldn't "make up for Regensburg" but it did represent an evolution in the pope's thinking about Islam. "He's made substantial changes (in his thinking) but he's not coming out and saying 'I atone for my sin at Regensburg.' Kalin said. He's not saying that and he's not going to say that. But reading between the lines, it's happened gradually."pope-insidePrince Ghazi bin Muhammed bin Talal, a leading Common Word signatory who was the pope's host at the mosque today, brought up the Regensburg speech in his address. But he did this in the context of thanking Benedict for expressing his regrets "for the hurt caused by this lecture to Muslims."
(Photo: Benedict inside the mosque, 9 May 2009/Ahmed Jadallah)

Benedict's Amman speech has gone a long way to putting Regensburg into context, and dialogue proponents like the Common Word group are helping him do it. But it's a wild card that can still be drawn against him, especially by Islamists opposed to cooperation with Christians. "My guess is that he'll give three, four or five more speeches like this to try to make people forget the Regensburg speech," Kalin commented.

from FaithWorld:

When in a minefield, a pope first turns to prayer

May 8, 2009

pope-bannerWhen a pope enters a minefield, the most natural reaction for him is to pray. Pope Benedict stressed prayer when he began his tip-toe over the explosive terrain of the Middle East starting his May 8-15 tour of Jordan, Israel and the Palestinian territories today. From the start, in his remarks during the flight to Amman, he stressed that people should pray for peace. We are not a political power but a spiritual force and this spiritual force is a reality which can contribute to progress in the peace process," he said on the plane. "As believers we are convinced that that prayer is a real force, it opens the world to God. We are convinced that God listens and can affect history." This is theologically sound, of course. It's also politically clever. It's the lowest common denominator in the Holy Land, maybe the only option all sides might agree on.

from FaithWorld:

PAPA DIXIT: Pope Benedict’s quotes on plane, in Amman

May 8, 2009

pope-plane-romePope Benedict plans to speak publicly at least 29 times during his May 8-15 trip to Jordan, Israel and the Palestinian territories. Apart from covering the main points in our news reports, we also plan to post excerpts from his speeches in a FathWorld series called "Papa dixit" ("the pope said").

from FaithWorld:

GUESTVIEW: Finding and defining the religious pluralism within

By Reuters Staff
May 4, 2009

The following is a guest contribution. Reuters is not responsible for the content and the views expressed are the authors’ alone. Matthew Weiner is Program Director at the Interfaith Center of New York. Rev. Bud Heckman is Director for External Relations at Religions for Peace and editor of InterActive Faith: The Essential Interreligious Community-Building Handbook (SkyLight, 2008).