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from The Great Debate:

States act on tax reform

The United States needs tax reform -- and soon. Our corporate tax rate is 35 percent, while the European average is 25 percent. We are not competitive. Our individual tax code has rates too high and too many politically driven tax credits and deductions. All true. But it’s also likely that no real tax reform will move in Washington for the next three years.

Why? Because the Democrats,who control the White House veto pen, oppose any reform that does not include at least $1 trillion in higher taxes on net and the Republicans, who control the House of Representatives, will never vote for such a tax hike.

In Washington we have three years of guaranteed gridlock ahead. But in 37 of the 50 states there is unified government -- the opposite of gridlock.

Republicans have the governorship and total control of the legislature in 24 states, while Democrats hold complete political control in 13 states. This means that in many state capitols, Republicans and Democrats are able to carry out their preferred policy solutions alone. No partisan bickering. No “party of no.”

from Expert Zone:

Is gold a good investment once again?

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The increase in gold prices in the last two months has rekindled interest in the yellow metal as a vehicle for investment. It was after the 2008 global financial crisis that gold became the most preferred asset, with prices doubling in four years.

Why was gold preferred? It was not so much as a hedge against inflation but as an insurance against uncertainty. When the economy is faltering and the future looks bleak, gold becomes a preferred asset.

from Global Investing:

It’s not end of the world at the Fragile Five

Despite all the doom and gloom surrounding capital-hungry Fragile Five countries, real money managers have not abandoned the ship at all.

Aberdeen Asset Management has overweight equity positions in Indonesia, India, Turkey and Brazil -- that's already 4 of the five countries that have come under market pressure because of their funding deficits.  The fund is also positive on Thailand and the Philippines.

from Expert Zone:

Time for a relook at FDI in insurance intermediaries

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

Insurance companies in India have an FDI limit of 26 percent, which may be revised upwards in the coming months. The industry requires funds to grow and the revision can be an enabler, but the process may take some time as it requires legislative approval and there seems to be some opposition to the move.

Since the industry is still in its nascent stage, the insurance regulator also places the same FDI cap on insurance intermediaries such as brokers and web aggregators, severely limiting their ability to raise funds to grow their business.

from Global Investing:

Steroids, punch bowls and the music still playing: stocks dance into 2014

Four years into the stock market party fueled by a punch bowl overflowing with trillions of dollars of central bank liquidity, you'd think a hangover might be looming.

But almost all of the fund managers attending the London leg of the Reuters Global Investment Summit this week - with some $4 trillion of assets under management - say the party will continue into 2014.

from Breakingviews:

Fund managers could learn from hometown Red Sox

By Martin Hutchinson

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Fund managers could learn from the hometown Red Sox. The team is a win away from being baseball’s champions. Its success hinges on the disposal of concentrated long-term bets in favor of liquidity, early-stage backing and steadier assets. Such diversification is a good reminder for the Boston-based investment industry, where the likes of Fidelity and Putnam are based, and beyond.

from Breakingviews:

Europe’s investors miss value cues, again

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By Robert Cole

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

It is one of the oldest rules in the investment book: buy what’s cheap, sell what’s expensive. The current crop of European fund managers must have slept through that lesson.

from Global Investing:

Emerging equities: out of the doghouse

Emerging stocks, in the doghouse for months and months, haven't done too badly of late. The main EM index,  has rallied more than 11 percent since its end-August troughs, outgunning the S&P 500's 3 percent rise in this period. Bank of America/Merrill Lynch strategist Michael Hartnett reminds us of the extreme underweight positioning in emerging stocks last month, as revealed by his bank's monthly investor survey.  Anyone putting on a long EM-short UK equities trade back then would have been in the money with returns of 540 basis points, he says.

Undoubtedly, the postponement of the Fed taper is the main reason for the rally.  Another big inducement is that valuations look very cheap (forward P/E is around 9.9 versus a 10-year average of 10.8) .

from Breakingviews:

Britain can gain from China’s empire builders

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By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Britain once had nothing to offer China but silver and opium. Now it has holidays, banks and building sites. George Osborne, the UK Chancellor of the Exchequer, and London’s mayor Boris Johnson are using visits to Beijing to say just how welcoming the UK is likely to be. It’s a triumph of openness, and provided the UK chooses its partners carefully and the Chinese are tactful, both sides will benefit.

from Global Investing:

Bernanke Put for emerging markets? Not really

The Fed's unexpectedly dovish position last week has sparked a rally in emerging markets -- not only did the U.S. central bank's all-powerful boss Ben Bernanke keep his $85 billion-a-month money printing programme in place, he also mentioned emerging markets in his post-meeting news conference, noting the potential impact of Fed policy on the developing world. All that, along with the likelihood of the dovish Janet Yellen succeeding Bernanke was described by Commerzbank analysts as "a triple whammy for EM." A positive triple whammy, presumably.

Now it may be going too far to conclude there is some kind of Bernanke Put for emerging markets of the sort the U.S. stock market is said to enjoy -- the assumption, dating back to Alan Greenspan's days, that things cant go too wrong for markets because the Fed boss will wade in with lower rates to right things. But the fact remains that global pressure on the Fed has been mounting to avoid any kind of violent disruption to the flow of cheap money -- remember the cacophony at this month's G20 summit? Second, the spike in U.S. yields may have been the main motivation for standing pat but the Treasury selloff was at least partly driven by emerging central banks which have needed to dip into their reserve stash to defend their own currencies. According to IMF estimates, developing countries hold some $3.5 trillion worth of Treasuries, of which just under half is in China. (See here for my colleague Mike Dolan's June 12 article on the EM-Fed linkages)

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