from India Insight:

Movie Review: Dharam Sankat Mein

April 10, 2015

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

If Fuwad Khan’s “Dharam Sankat Mein” is any indication, Bollywood is in the midst of a theological crossroads. It certainly is debating the idea of God with more fervour than before.

from The Great Debate:

Egypt’s grand mufti: No justification for terror in any religion

By Shawky Allam
April 1, 2015

A view of the Mosque of Mohammed Ali in the Citadel, the Sultan Hasan Mosque and the Al-Rifa'i Mosque in Cairo

The Mosque of Mohammed Ali in the Citadel (top), the Sultan Hasan Mosque and the Al-Rifa'i Mosque (bottom right) in Cairo, May 20, 2008, REUTERS/Nasser Nuri

from The Great Debate:

How Islamic State hijacked Islam’s history of tolerance

By Mohamad Bazzi
March 12, 2015

Assyrians hold banners as they march in solidarity with the Assyrians abducted by Islamic State fighters in Syria earlier this week, in Beirut

Assyrians hold banners as they march in solidarity with the Assyrians abducted by Islamic State fighters in Syria earlier this week, in Beirut, Feb. 28, 2015. Militants in northeast Syria are now estimated to have abducted at least 220 Assyrian Christians this week, a group monitoring the war reported. The banner (R) reads, "We are not afraid of whom kills the flesh, we are not afraid of who destroys the stone. Assyrians and victorious." REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

from The Great Debate:

On 70th anniversary of Auschwitz’s liberation, little tolerance for ‘others’ in Germany

By Lars Fischer
January 27, 2015

Participants of a grass-roots anti-Muslim movement hold German flags during a demonstration in Berlin January 5, 2015.  REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschk

Participants of a grass-roots anti-Muslim movement hold German flags during a demonstration in Berlin January 5, 2015. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschk

from The Great Debate:

Secularism – not sensitivity – is the key to democracy

By John Lloyd
January 27, 2015

French Education and Research minister Vallaud-Belkacem in Paris

French Education and Research Minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem attends a news conference at the the French prime minister's offices, in Paris, Jan. 22, 2015. France announced new measures last week aimed at helping schools combat radical Islam, racism and anti-Semitism in reaction to deadly Islamist attacks three weeks ago. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer

from Photographers' Blog:

From central banker to Islamic king

August 15, 2014

Kano, Nigeria

By Joe Penney

Last year Lamido Sanusi wore pin stripe suits and a colorful array of bow ties to work, and his job consisted mostly of managing interest rates and keeping inflation under control.

from John Lloyd:

The less well Muslims and Jews actually know each other, the more hatred grows

By John Lloyd
August 7, 2014

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In the small town of San Dona di Piave near Venice last Friday, an imam, Raoudi Albdelbar, asked Allah to, "Kill them all (the Jews), down to the last one; make poison of their food; transform the air that they breath into flames, and put terror in their hearts.” The imam was so proud of his sermon that he made a video of it and posted it on his Facebook page -- from where it went viral. Earlier this week, Italian antiterrorist police showed up and arrested the imam on charges of inciting violence, and began the process of expelling him to his native Morocco.

from Photographers' Blog:

Uighurs of Shanghai

July 22, 2014

Shanghai, China
By Aly Song

The traditional home of China’s Muslim Uighur community is the far western state of Xinjiang, a region that has been plagued by violence in recent years.

from Photographers' Blog:

The search for a mosque in Athens

June 27, 2013

Athens, Greece

By Yorgos Karahalis

Some say that to come in contact with “God” is a spiritual matter that has nothing to do with the particular spot or place where such contact takes place. Well, if it were that simple then there would be no need to build churches or mosques.

from Reihan Salam:

Boston and the future of Islam in America

By Reihan Salam
April 22, 2013

One of the central questions surrounding the Boston Marathon bombings is whether they portend a larger wave of terror attacks by homegrown Islamic radicals. The culprits, two brothers of Chechen origin, one of whom was a naturalized U.S. citizen, had both lived in the country for more than a decade. While the older brother is reported to have been sullen, resentful and ill at ease in his adopted country, the younger brother was by all accounts a well-mannered kid, whose main vice was marijuana. Many fear that if these two men could turn viciously against the country that gave them refuge, the same might be true of at least some small number of their co-religionists.