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from MacroScope:

Margin for error

A Union Flag and Scottish Saltire fly over Britain's Cabinet Office in central London

Another day, another Scottish opinion poll and this time a different message, but only slightly.

A Survation survey last night showed 53 percent of Scots would vote to remain in the UK, 47 for independence. Ten percent of the electorate remain undecided. That counters three recent polls which have shown a dead heat or slight lead for the Yes campaign. Given the margin for error – three points either way – they all suggest next Thursday’s vote is too close to call although hitherto, Survation has consistently put support for independence higher than other pollsters.

There is a chance that the dramatic narrowing of the polls – with one giving a lead for the Yes camp – has come too early for the nationalists as it makes all Scots realize that their votes count and concentrates minds. It is easy to vote for independence if you don’t think it’s going to happen and there is a week still to weigh up the consequences.

There is mounting evidence of the economic pain that could be inflicted north of the border. Lloyds Banking Group confirmed our recent scoop last night, saying it would set up legal entities in England i.e. relocate south. And Royal Bank of Scotland said it would base itself in London in the event of a Yes vote.
Scottish banks are increasingly concerned about worried customers looking to move funds out of the region because of fears over the impact of independence.

from The Great Debate:

Why Erdogan doesn’t get it

Protesters run as riot police fire teargas during a protest at Taksim Square in Istanbul June 11, 2013. REUTERS/Osman Orsal

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan doesn’t get it. Turkey’s strongman is still fighting the Deep State

from Photographers' Blog:

Taksim Square: One woman’s protest

Istanbul, Turkey

By Murad Sezer

Anti-government protests have gripped Turkey for almost two weeks, and Istanbul’s famous Taksim Square and adjoining Gezi Park have become a center of the demonstrations, with thousands flocking there to voice their opposition to Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan and his ruling AK party.

Ayse Diskaya is one of them. She is a 48-year-old housewife, an active member of the left-wing cultural organisation Halkevleri, a women’s rights activist – and now a Gezi Park protester. Riot police cleared the square early on Wednesday but Ayse says she will return to Gezi Park later in the day.

from Photographers' Blog:

Dispatch from Taksim Square

Istanbul, Turkey

By Murad Sezer

Taksim Square is the heart of Istanbul. It's the meeting point for lovers, tourists and protesters.

On the weekends if you stroll around the square and crowded Istiklal street, a hub for shopping and bars, you can witness various political demonstrations. Women protest against domestic violence, soccer fans gather, anti-government far leftists groups rally and on Saturdays mothers demand to know the fate of their missing relatives. Riot police are never far away, so it's no big surprise if you smell tear gas all of a sudden in the middle of Taksim.

from The Human Impact:

Al Qaeda “rebranding” itself to remain relevant – counter-terrorism expert

Peter Knoope, director of the International Centre for Counter-Terrorism - The Hague, was part of a panel discussion on race politics, Islamophobia and extremisms of the far right and left at "Reporting on International Security and Terrorism" in Istanbul.

http://youtu.be/ILzKqk3fduE

Discussions are hosted by international security experts and attended by 25 journalists from around the world.

from The Human Impact:

Turkey needs multilateral strategy for Syria refugee influx – policy expert

Hugh Pope, a policy expert on Turkey and Cyprus spoke with AlertNet after delivering a presentation at a conference in Istanbul.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/v3pX6FKro4w[/youtube]

The three-day "Reporting on International Security and Terrorism" seminar examines the role of the news media and how journalists can avoid being exploited by terrorists to help them achieve their goals

from Global Investing:

Melancholia, social class and GDP forecasts in Turkey

An interesting take on GDP stats and those who make the predictions. An analysis of economic growth forecasts for several emerging markets over 2006-2010 has led Renaissance Capital economist Mert Yildiz to conclude that analysts of Turkish origin (and he is one) tend to be: 

a) far more pessimistic about their country's economic growth outlook than the foreigners, and 

from FaithWorld:

Hillary Clinton seeks to smooth Islamic defamation row with OIC

(U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) Secretary General Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu (L) in Istanbul July 15, 2011/Murad Sezer)

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton agreed with a major global Islamic organization on Friday to pursue new ways of resolving debates over religion without resorting to legal steps against defamation. Clinton met Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, the head of the 57-nation Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), in Istanbul to help set up new international mechanisms both protect free speech and combat religious discrimination around the world.

from Business Traveller:

My city’s better than yours

“The leading cities of the world – the global cities – are the very nodal hubs that knit the global economy together. Without these global cities, there would be no global economy.”
Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong, global economic advisor, MasterCard

Why MasterCard’s recently released “Worldwide Index of Global Destination Cities” should pique the interest of meeting planners, dealmakers, investors and governments the world over.

from Photographers' Blog:

Goodbye to hell

In the second half of the 2010-2011 Turkish football season Galatasaray moved to its new home ground in Istanbul, the Turk Telekom Arena, a 52,000-seat multi-purpose stadium replacing the Ali Sami Yen Stadium.

The fate of the legendary Ali Sami Yen Stadium is now sealed.

Ali Sami Yen stadium in Istanbul 2010. REUTERS/Sevim Sen

The demolition of Ali Sami Yen, one of the most iconic venues in Turkish football and the home to one of the three oldest Istanbul football clubs Galatsaray for 47 years, started last week. For almost half a century, the yellow-and-red lions hosted their rivals in this temple with the slogan "welcome to hell". The stadium played host to victories against European giants FC Barcelona, A.Bilbao, AC Milan, Real Madrid, E.Frankfurt, and a historic victory against Neuchatel Xamax. Most notably it was the scene of Galatasaray’s triumphal UEFA Cup campaign in 2000.

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