from MacroScope:

Osborne stakes out election ground with little fiscal leeway

By Mike Peacock
March 19, 2014

The annual UK budget is always a big set piece but it’s hard to remember one where there have been fewer advance leaks – indicative of a steady-as-she-goes approach by George Osborne.
Having put so much political capital into reducing the deficit, to switch now at a time when the economy is recovering strongly would be politically risky. And with debt falling only slowly there is little fiscal leeway.

from Africa News blog:

S.Africa must reform white-dominated economy

June 26, 2012

South Africa's economy is still largely under the control of whites who held power under apartheid, President Jacob Zuma has said calling  for a "dramatic shift" to redress the wealth balance more evenly in favour of the black majority.

from Africa News blog:

Are African governments suppressing art?

May 31, 2012

By Cosmas Butunyi

The dust is finally settling on the storm that was kicked off in South Africa by a controversial painting of President Jacob Zuma with his genitals exposed.

from Africa News blog:

Is Zuma home and dry after Malema’s expulsion?

May 18, 2012

By Cosmas Butunyi

South Africa’s ruling African National Congress may have expelled the rubble-rousing youth league president, Julius Malema, but challenges still remain for President Jacob Zuma, who is seeking a second term in a race that he is considered the frontrunner.

from Breakingviews:

South Africa has work cut out to reach BRIC goal

August 26, 2010

South African president Jacob Zuma wants to join the BRICs. The likely deluge of foreign investment from membership of the club representing the biggest fast-growing economies would bring huge benefits. But Zuma has plenty to prove -- including that he can avoid the BRICs' worst failings.

from Africa News blog:

South Africa’s birthday party that isn’t

May 31, 2010

It is exactly one hundred years today since the formation of the Union of South Africa, but there are no signs of celebration over that. SPORT SOCCER WORLDWhat exactly is the Union, you might ask? On May 31 1910, the southern part of Africa that is today known as the Republic of South Africa became a unitary state under British dominion in pretty much the geographical shape which exists to this day.

from Africa News blog:

Was Zuma right to reveal HIV status?

By Reuters Staff
April 26, 2010

SAFRICA/ South African President Jacob Zuma has disclosed that he is HIV negative after his most recent test for the virus that causes AIDS.
 Zuma said he wanted “to promote openness and to eradicate the silence and stigma that accompanies this epidemic” in a country which has more people infected with the virus than any other – an estimated five million.

from Africa News blog:

Violence and tension come at worst time for World Cup

April 12, 2010

SAFRICA-TERREBLANCHE/World Cup organisers probably dreamed of a placid, trouble-free final countdown to the soccer spectacular, with all the fears about crime, bad transport and accommodation shortages pushed to the background for Africa's biggest sports extravaganza. Sadly for them, they are getting the opposite. It would be difficult to conjure up a more unfortunate set of events less than 60 days before the tournament. Simmering racial tensions have burst into the open because of the murder of white supremacist Eugene Terre'blanche and the diatribes of Julius Malema, leader of the youth wing of South Africa's ruling African National Congress, who refuses to pipe down despite tough reprimands from President Jacob Zuma and other party officials. Even before what must be looking to hapless officials like a perfect storm, scenes had become commonplace of township residents rioting around South Africa against lack of improvements in their lives some 16 years after the end of apartheid.
To add to the torture for World Cup officials while the spotlight is fixed on South Africa, municipal workers have declared an indefinite strike over wages, threatening the chaotic scenes seen last year when rubbish was strewn over the streets. South Africa's biggest labour federation has threatened strikes during the tournament to protest against big hikes in power prices.
All of this illustrates the point that countries or cities staging major world events suddenly become fixed in an often uncomfortable glare of world attention as the big day approaches. But even by these standards, South Africa looks unfortunate. World Cup officials, led by chief organiser Danny Jordaan, have spent literally years fending off suggestions that soccer fans will be in mortal danger in South Africa, which has one of the globe's highest rates of violent crime. Jordaan and others have repeated a familiar mantra-- the country has staged 150 sports and other events since the end of apartheid with little problem, millions of tourists have enjoyed South Africa's many attractions for years without major criminal attacks and protecting a finite event is a lot less complex than overcoming the national crime wave--especially since 40,000 police have been mobilised to do only that.

from Africa News blog:

How will South Africa reward Caster’s triumph???

August 25, 2009

South Africa ’s  Caster Semenya returned home today following her 800m gold medal-win at the  World Athletics Championships in Berlin .

from Africa News blog:

Zuma’s time to deliver?

July 23, 2009

Poor South Africans have called upon newly elected president Jacob Zuma to keep his election promises on service delivery. The past week has seen a number of protests flaring up across South Africa against what protesters called poor service delivery.