from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

Janet Kick a Hole In the Sky

July 29, 2015

The July meeting was never meant to be much of a thing with the Federal Reserve, and that’s exactly how it’s worked out. The Fed seems like it is still targeting a modest increase in rates in September, with – as many strategists have already noted – the real action to come later on down the road, as Janet Yellen and others have argued that the first move isn’t the one to really worry about.

from MacroScope:

U.S. Fed interest rate “crawl-off” not yet fixed for September

July 28, 2015

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????A U.S. Federal Reserve interest rate hike in September is almost certain according to many forecasters and investors, but the decision to tighten policy for the first time in nearly a decade is not as clear-cut as it may appear.

from MacroScope:

Fed: behind the curve, or too trigger happy? Neither

July 15, 2015

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????As the U.S. Federal Reserve edges closer to its first interest hike in nearly a decade, its critics are lining up into one of two camps: either the Fed is hopelessly behind the curve, and will have to grapple with runaway inflation very soon; or the Fed seems overzealous in wanting to get interest rates back to what it would call a normal level and instead should wait until late this year or next before hiking.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

Binge-watching earnings and the Fed

July 15, 2015

The Federal Reserve is the early concern on the part of investors – Janet Yellen’s testimony is out in the morning when she appears before the combative House of Representatives, though her speech on Friday highlighting her concerns about ongoing slack in the labor market and the possibility that international issues may undermine the Fed’s plans fed the bearish case when it comes to rate increases.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

What a Week!

July 10, 2015

The desire for the weekend would normally be among the motivating factors for hoping for a quiet day on Friday, particularly after the week the markets have endured - China continuing to melt down, Greece getting ready to go down the rabbit hole, the NYSE experiencing a three-hour halt as a result of a software update - if only the weekend didn't pose its own special danger. And before that, Janet Yellen stands in the way too, so the relief won't come for investors until that's done.

from MacroScope:

UK pay may be taking off but rates will stay grounded for a while yet

July 2, 2015

The Bank of England is seen through columns in LondonBritish wage growth will outstrip the Bank of England's forecast this year but that doesn't mean the first rate hike will come sooner.

from The Great Debate:

Will someone please put Fannie and Freddie out of their misery?

By Mark Zandi
May 7, 2015

Toll Brothers luxury homes are shown sold before construction is completed in Oceanside

Toll Brothers luxury homes are shown sold before construction is completed in Oceanside, California, August 20, 2013. REUTERS/Mike Blake

from MacroScope:

Data isn’t as objective as the Fed might have you believe

April 28, 2015

SFFedTshirt.jpgFed officials say they will be “data-dependent” when it comes to making monetary policy. San Francisco Fed President John Williams feels so strongly about it, he’s even printed up a T-shirt to get that message across. But truth be told, data-dependency is not as objective as it sounds. Data doesn’t dictate policy; it’s the interpretation of data that’s key. What is rate-hike-worthy data to one policymaker is keep-the-pedal-to-the-metal data for another. Take, for instance, U.S. GDP growth. Richmond Fed President Jeffrey Lacker says he expects GDP growth to average 2 percent to 2.5 percent this year, a pace that would justify a Fed rate hike in June. Chicago Fed President Charles Evans expects 3 percent growth this year, and does not believe even that would justify a rate hike until the first half of 2016. So what does it tell you about monetary policy if you see GDP growth of 2.5 percent? Not a whole lot, judging from these two. And the statements of other Fed officials are hardly more helpful. Indeed, as Atlanta Fed President Dennis Lockhart said recently, “I don't think it is advisable to approach such a decision with rigid quantitative triggers in mind.” Watch the data, sure. But don’t assume the data will tell you much about the exact timing of the rate hike. Monetary policy – it’s subjective. Maybe some policymaker will print that on a T-shirt.

from MacroScope:

Déjà vu? Fed may struggle to hike if U.S. optimism fades for H2

April 28, 2015

RTR4VVNE.jpgThe U.S. Federal Reserve may find it even more tough to raise interest rates as the year wears on if dwindling expectations for growth are any guide.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

NFP may surprise to the downside, weigh on ‘15 Fed rate hike, economist, analyst says

March 5, 2015

The monthly U.S. nonfarm payroll data for February will be released on Friday and with it, another swarm of speculation as to whether it will prompt the Fed to raise rates this year will follow.