from Anatole Kaletsky:

Stock markets set to take off as Europe, Asia abandon austerity

By Anatole Kaletsky
November 28, 2014

A pedestrian walks past an electronic board showing Japan's Nikkei average outside a brokerage in Tokyo

The Great Divergence is a term coined by economic historians to explain the sudden acceleration of growth and technology in Europe from the 16th century onward, while other civilizations such as China, India, Japan and Persia remained in their pre-modern state. This phrase has recently acquired a very different meaning, however,  more relevant to global economic and financial conditions today.

from Breakingviews:

Faulty air bags puncture Takata financial cushion

November 27, 2014

By Peter Thal Larsen

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

How to make Japan’s tax timetable more credible

November 19, 2014

By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

Turning Japanese

November 17, 2014

Just when the market thought it was out, it gets pulled back in. The bond market continues to threaten to break into higher levels, but something always seems to undermine that story.

from MacroScope:

Huge miss on Japan GDP suggests more forecasting complacency

November 17, 2014

BWhile few people have had serious hopes for a prolonged Japanese economic boom for a long time, the range of forecasts provided for Japan's recent economic performance gives you an idea of just how wildly unexpected the news was today that it is back in recession.

from Breakingviews:

Japan’s surprise recession clouds fiscal future

November 17, 2014

By Andy Mukherjee 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Japan index: Tightening the purse strings

November 12, 2014

By Katrina Hamlin

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Why political gridlock works for the U.S. economy, but not for Japan or EU

By Anatole Kaletsky
November 7, 2014

U.S. President Obama hosts a luncheon for bi-partisan Congressional leaders in the Old Family Dining Room at the White House in Washington

Is gridlocked government a betrayal of democracy? Or does it allow citizens to get on with their lives and businesses, unencumbered by meddlesome politicians?

from Breakingviews:

Review: The secret cause of economic crises

By Guest Contributor
November 7, 2014

By Edward Chancellor

The author is a guest columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

What is the glue which holds an economy together? Disciples of Adam Smith would argue that self-interest serves as the organising principle. The problem with this way of thinking is that it overlooks the fact that man is not an island unto himself. He is a social animal, who must have constant dealings with other people. Besides, according to John Maynard Keynes, it is impossible to pursue our self-interest rationally, because we don’t have enough information to make probabilistic judgments about the future. Instead, we must rely on irrational animal spirits as a spur to action.

from Breakingviews:

Japan’s banks may swap old nemesis for new foe

November 7, 2014

By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.