from The Great Debate:

How to solve the House speaker fight

By Paul Goldman and Mark J. Rozell
October 14, 2015

U.S. House Speaker Boehner re-enters after excusing himself from news conference following closed Republican House caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington

House Speaker John Boehner re-enters after excusing himself from a news conference following a closed Republican House caucus meeting at the Capitol in Washington, September 29, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

from The Great Debate:

Disorder in the House – just as the Founding Fathers wanted it

By Joshua Spivak
October 12, 2015

U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) pauses during his weekly news conference in Washington

House Speaker John Boehner pauses during his weekly news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, July 29, 2015.REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

from The Great Debate:

Why the letter to Iran won’t end well for Republicans

By Elizabeth A. Cobbs
March 11, 2015

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu addresses a joint meeting of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) addresses a joint meeting of Congress ion Capitol Hill in Washington, March 3, 2015. House Speaker John Boehner (L) (R-Ohio) and President pro tempore of the Senate Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) applaud Netanyahu. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

from The Great Debate:

Why Boehner’s invite to Netanyahu is unconstitutional

By Elizabeth A. Cobbs
March 2, 2015

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Israel's PM Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in Washington

President Barack Obama (R) meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in Washington, October 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

from The Great Debate:

The war between Congress and the White House

By Bill Schneider
February 6, 2015

U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner watches as U.S. President Barack Obama hosts a bipartisan meeting of Congressional leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington

House Speaker John Boehner watches as President Barack Obama hosts a bipartisan meeting of congressional leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, January 13, 2015. REUTERS/Larry Downing

from The Great Debate:

Israel’s dangerous new game playing out in Washington’s corridors of power

By Bill Schneider
January 27, 2015

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Israel's PM Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in Washington

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu listens as President Barack Obama (R) speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, October 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

from The Great Debate:

What does Eric Cantor’s loss mean? Gridlock until 2023

By Bill Schneider
June 12, 2014

Cantor and Boehner hold a news conference after a Republican Party caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington

Gridlock is likely to rule the federal government until at least 2023.  Why 2023?  Because it may not be until after the 2020 Census that the Democrats have a good chance of regaining control of the House of Representatives.

from The Great Debate:

Benghazi: The zombie scandal

By Suzanne Garment
May 9, 2014

Former U.S. secretary of state Hillary Clinton speaks to members of the World Affairs Council in Portland, Oregon

We’re not making scandals the way we used to.

The House of Representatives has now voted, virtually along party lines, to create the Benghazi Select Committee that conservatives have long called for. The atmosphere of scandal that has surrounded Bill and Hillary Clinton for decades has gotten, at least temporarily, a renewed lease on life.

from The Great Debate:

Boehner: The fight to hold the party line

By Terry Golway
May 2, 2014

U.S. House Speaker Boehner holds a news conference at the Republican National Committee offices in Washington

In his latest attempt to impose discipline on his famously disorderly Republican caucus, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) chose the soft power of public mockery over the more militant promise of private retribution. Speaking at an event in his home state, Boehner lashed out at fellow Republicans who have stymied immigration reform. “Here’s the attitude,” Boehner said of his recalcitrant colleagues. ‘Oooh, don’t make me do this. Oooh, this is too hard.’ ”

from The Great Debate:

Populism? Where are the pitchforks?

By Robert L. Borosage
April 16, 2014

Americans are in a surly mood, confronting rules they feel are rigged against them. President Barack Obama captured this populist temper in his re-election campaign.  He then launched his second term declaring that inequality is the “most pressing challenge of our time,” and laying out a popular agenda to raise the federal minimum wage, provide pay equity for women, establish universal pre-school and other initiatives that polls show the public strongly supports.