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from Tales from the Trail:

Huntsman’s face still on Republican “Mt Rushmore” sand sculpture

The city of Myrtle Beach went all out for Monday's Republican debate, even getting sand sculpture artists to build a mini Mount Rushmore of Republican presidential candidates out of sand.

The only problem?

The 1,175,100-pound horseshoe-shaped sand sculpture has the face of Jon Huntsman smack in the middle. His decision to pull out of the race came after the Myrtle Beach area Chamber of Commerce unveiled the sculpture.

Apparently there were no plans to pour water on his image or erase him from the sculpture. After he formally pulled out of the race and endorsed frontrunner Mitt Romney, Huntsman's face was still there with a big toothy grin smiling at all who walked by.

Photo credit: Nick Carey
Photo credit: REUTERS/Eric Thayer

from Tales from the Trail:

Colbert bumps Huntsman in South Carolina

Former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman finished a disappointing third on Tuesday in the presidential primary in New Hampshire, despite focusing his campaign on the state and attending some 150 events there. But things are, arguably, worse for him in South Carolina, where a new poll ahead of the state's Jan. 21 primary put him behind comedian and late-night talk show host, Stephen Colbert.

The survey, by the Democratic polling firm Public Policy Polling, had Colbert in sixth place, with just 5 percent support, in South Carolina's primary, behind Mitt Romney (27 percent), Newt Gingrich (23 percent), Rick Santorum (18 percent), Ron Paul (8 percent) and Rick Perry (7 percent). But he was ahead of Huntsman's 4 percent and former Louisiana Gov. Buddy Roemer (1 percent).

from Photographers' Blog:

On the campaign trail with the Underdog

By Jessica Rinaldi

Every four years we photographers load our suitcases with layers of warm clothes and head to the Granite State to photograph the political frenzy that is the New Hampshire Primary. New Hampshire and Iowa are considered by many to be retail politics at their best, the states where candidates get on the ground to talk with voters, and local residents have the unique chance to see who the candidates are. It’s an opportunity for the candidates to test out their talking points and fine tune their campaign strategy, to see what floats.

While all of that is well and good in the warm summer months at the beginning of their journey, by the time that chilly spotlight turns from Iowa to New Hampshire they tend to have already become well-seasoned politicians. It is with that knowledge that we head to New Hampshire, where we know that we will be composing other photographers in or out of our shots depending on the story and jostling for position in front of the diner booth, factory worker, rotary club member, or veteran that happens to call to us at one of the many campaign events we shoot throughout the day. At least, that’s what I had figured I would do this time around.

from Breakingviews:

U.S. presidential race has a lone bank-buster

By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

It’s been a while since any leading U.S. politician made lots of noise about breaking up big banks. Surprisingly, it’s coming from one of the Republican presidential contenders: Jon Huntsman. Indeed, it’s one of the few things setting him apart from his party, and even from President Barack Obama. But Huntsman’s financial reform plan would require a fickle Congress to play ball and poses big practical difficulties. Moreover, the Dodd-Frank Act already does the trick.

All of the Republicans traipsing around New Hampshire this week are threatening to repeal that bill, though for varying reasons. The former Utah governor, however, is the only one offering a tangible path for what would follow Dodd-Frank’s repeal - a distinction he has been loudly touting in the Granite State ahead of Tuesday’s primary.

from Tales from the Trail:

Huntsman wouldn’t be the only U.S. president to speak Chinese

 

Republican presidential hopeful Jon Huntsman's language skills have been in the spotlight since Saturday, when he said during a presidential candidates' debate that his rival Mitt Romney does not understand U.S. relations with China -- underscoring his point by saying so in Mandarin.

Huntsman is a former U.S. ambassador to China who learned the language as a Mormon missionary in Taiwan in the late 1980s. His campaign says the former governor of Utah also speaks Hokkien, a Chinese dialect used in Taiwan. 

from Tales from the Trail:

162 New Hampshire visits later, Huntsman hopes for late surge

Jon Huntsman Jr. has dedicated his entire campaign to doing well in New Hampshire. That's meant multiple visits to small places like the northern town of Littleton, pop. 6,000, where Huntsman appeared for a photo opportunity at the local diner.

Unfortunately for Huntsman there were only four people (reporters aside) at the restaurant when he arrived -- and none of them knew he was coming. One couple waved off his approach, saying, "We're from Vermont."

from Tales from the Trail:

Santorum momentum doesn’t transfer to New Hampshire

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum has seen his star rise in Iowa, where polls show him moving into third place behind Mitt Romney and Ron Paul. But in New Hampshire he's still mired in the fourth tier of Republican candidates. Two new polls out today show Romney with a wide lead in the Granite State and Ron Paul running second with Jon Huntsman and Newt Gingrich tied for fourth.

Santorum is buried at 3 percent in one of the polls, by Suffolk University, and at 4 percent in the second, by Magellan Strategies--about even with Texas Gov. Rick Perry and Rep. Michele Bachmann.

from Tales from the Trail:

Occupy New Hampshire Primary

Two Occupy protesters braved freezing temperatures in Laconia, New Hampshire, on Thursday to stand silently outside a Rotary lunch meeting where Republican presidential candidate Jon Huntsman made his 130th campaign appearance in the state. They held a sign that read "Occupy NH Primary" and also a large mock ballot with a tick next to a "We the People" option instead of the Republican or Democrat options.

While it's not clear what role protesters plan to play in the 2012 U.S. elections, they are already making themselves heard. Occupy protesters have interrupted campaign speeches by President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich. They have also targeted New Jersey Governor Chris Christie as he campaigned for Mitt Romney, the current frontrunner in the Republican White House race.

from Tales from the Trail:

Huntsman goes after the media

For months, former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman's presidential campaign has arguably been kept afloat by the media. Fundraising has lagged and his national poll numbers are still at about 2 percent -- the same as when he entered the race in June. Yet Huntsman has received lengthy and favorable profiles by the New York Times magazine, Newsweek, Esquire and Vogue -- coverage that Buddy Roemer or Gary Johnson, who have registered similar poll numbers, or Ron Paul, who has much better ones, could only dream of.

But that didn't keep Huntsman from lashing out at the media today while campaigning in Nashua, N.H. "My hot button is when the media have me come across as cool and collected, because I'm not," said Huntsman, in response to a question about what makes him angry. "When I'm placed on the end of the debate stage and get three minutes of time because everyone is focused on who lights their hair on fire in the debate."

from Tales from the Trail:

Omen for Huntsman in Brady-Tebow duel?

There was a twist on the Tim Tebow relationship with the presidential race on Sunday.

Mary Kaye Huntsman, wife of Republican White House hopeful Jon Huntsman, wore a Tom Brady New England Patriots jersey to her husband's "town hall" meeting in Plaistow, NH.

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