from The Great Debate UK:

D-Day Dispatch: The first reporter on the beach

By Guest Contributor
June 6, 2014

"I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory." Dwight D Eisenhower, D- DAY – June 6, 1944

from John Lloyd:

Journalism’s next big problem

By John Lloyd
January 8, 2014

For a brief time at the beginning of the last century, politicians and journalists were friends. Not just friends, but colleagues, comrades in arms, letter-writing correspondents who praised and flattered each other in copious screeds. The politician during this period was President Theodore Roosevelt and the journalists were a handful of driven and talented writers. Many of them -- Lincoln Steffens, Ray Baker, Ida Tarbell and others -- were brought together by Samuel McClure in the magazine that bore his name.

from Breakingviews:

Time for Larry and Sergey to invest in journalism?

December 30, 2013

By Rob Cox and Richard Beales
The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

from Jack Shafer:

Does anyone still work at the ‘New York Times’?

By Jack Shafer
November 15, 2013

Recent defections of talent from the New York Times -- Nate Silver, David Pogue, Jeff Zeleny, Richard Berke, Brian Stelter, Matt Bai, et al. -- have unjelled the media firmament, according to Politico media columnist Dylan Byers. In a piece this week, Byers called the departures "a brain drain," "a sucker punch to staff morale," and an opportunity for the paper to come "face to face with a harsh reality" that in the new media age, its star journalists can no longer be satisfied by the “‘aura' of the newspaper of record." In the same day's Huffington Post, Michael Calderone had the paper fretting about its "retention rate," adding the names of Don Van Natta Jr., Lisa Tozzi, Judy Battista, Howard Beck, and Eric Wilson to the list of departees.

from The Great Debate:

A journalistic revolution

By Neal Gabler
October 31, 2013

Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who revealed National Security Agency surveillance leaks from former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, dueled this week with former New York Times executive editor Bill Keller over objectivity in journalism. Keller argued that impartiality forces a journalist to test all assumptions. Greenwald, however, countered that impartiality didn't test assumptions as much as confer authority to each of them. He explained that his new reporting venture, a website funded by eBay co-founder Pierre Omidyar, would treat official pronouncements with skepticism.

from Jack Shafer:

Why journalists are like cops and firefighters

By Jack Shafer
September 13, 2013

When some of our friends in academia read the top news about Syria on a website or in a newspaper, they do so through a lens ground by UCLA political scientist John Zaller. In a 2003 paper (pdf), Zaller analyzed two modes of news production that journalists often employ. While working in patrol mode, the press surveys the landscape for trouble and writes up what it finds, like a cop walking a beat and writing the occasional ticket or making the routine arrest. In alarm mode, aroused reporters respond to calls for help by lighting up the gumball, tossing it on the roof, and peeling out for the crime scene, the building afire, or the battleground.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Bezos needs to reinvent a business model, not journalism

By Anatole Kaletsky
August 15, 2013

It is now a week since Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon,  announced that he was buying the Washington Post, in what could be the most exciting case of convergence between the new media and the old since the merger of AOL with Time Warner. But how might Bezos re-launch this venerable flagship of U.S. journalism? And what could his ownership of the Post mean for news businesses around the world?

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Jeff Bezos and the new publishing revolution

By Nicholas Wapshott
August 8, 2013

The last few days have seen a flurry of purchases of ailing print journalism flagships. The Boston Globe was sold. Newsweek changed hands again. And, most spectacular of all, the Washington Post was bought for chump change. Meanwhile, the Tribune group -- publisher of the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune -- is readying itself for sale.

from Jack Shafer:

Why the underwear-bomber leak infuriated the Obama administration

By Jack Shafer
May 16, 2013

Journalists gasp and growl whenever prosecutors issue lawful subpoenas ordering them to divulge their confidential sources or to turn over potential evidence, such as notes, video outtakes or other records. It's an attack on the First Amendment, It's an attack on the First Amendment, It's an attack on the First Amendment, journalists and their lawyers chant. Those chants were heard this week, as it was revealed that Department of Justice prosecutors had seized two months’ worth of records from 20 office, home and cell phone lines used by Associated Press journalists in their investigation into the Yemen underwear-bomber leaks.

from Jack Shafer:

The dumb war on political intelligence

By Jack Shafer
May 8, 2013

For as long as legislative and regulatory acts have moved financial markets, investors and their operatives have scrummed like Komodo dragons for first bites of the fresh laws and orders dispensed by government. The stampede for the timeliest legal and regulatory information has given rise to the "political intelligence" business, which converts Capitol Hill whispers into stock market gains, and which has now attracted the full scrutiny of Congress and the regulatory apparatus.