from Stories I’d like to see:

How Boehner can save his speakership, JPMorgan’s lawyers, and the TV economics of the World Series

By Steven Brill
October 15, 2013

1. How Boehner can save his speakership:

Conventional wisdom is that House Speaker John Boehner has been afraid to defy the Ted Cruz-inspired House members who have insisted on closing the government and holding the debt ceiling hostage unless President Obama agrees to delay or defund Obamacare. The assumption is that Boehner fears that the most zealous Republicans in his caucus would turn on him and remove him as speaker. With that in mind, there’s one story I’ve been waiting for and still haven’t seen: Why haven’t the Democrats offered to protect Boehner if he runs into trouble by allowing the full House to vote to reopen the government and extend the debt ceiling?

from Global Investing:

Rich investors betting on emerging equities

By Reuters Staff
April 4, 2013

By Philip Baillie

Emerging equities may have significantly underperformed their richer peers so far this year (they are about 4 percent in the red compared with gains of more than 6 percent for their MSCI's index of developed stocks) , but almost a third of high net-worth individuals are betting on a rebound in coming months.

from MacroScope:

Priceless: The unfathomable cost of too big to fail

March 13, 2013

Just how big is the benefit that too-big-to-fail banks receive from their implicit taxpayer backing? Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke debated just that question with Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren during a recent hearing of the Senate Banking Committee. Warren cited a Bloomberg study based on estimates from the International Monetary Fund that found the subsidy, in the form of lower borrowing costs, amounts to some $83 billion a year.

from Global Investing:

Mexico manufacturing its way to investors’ hearts

By Reuters Staff
February 25, 2013

By Stephen Eisenhammer

Mexico appears to be the new Latin American darling for investors. With Brazil stalling, Latin America’s second largest economy is back in, after nearly two decades out in the cold.

from MuniLand:

The end of muniland interest-rate swaps for Pennsylvania?

By Cate Long
January 18, 2013

Pennsylvania may have suffered more damage from municipalities using interest rate swaps than any other state in America. Many cities and school districts were sold these “hedging” instruments after former governor Ed Rendell pushed legislation allowing their use in 2003. The fallout for the state has been devastating.

from Global Investing:

Record year for global bond markets in 2012

January 3, 2013

How good was 2012 for bond markets? Very good, by the look of the many records broken.

from Unstructured Finance:

While you were sleeping (the China ISM number came out)

December 3, 2012

By Katya Wachtel

For Omega Advisors' Steve Einhorn, the window of sleep-able hours is narrowing.

"One needs to know whats going on around the world. I turn in around midnight so I can monitor what's going on in China and Japan," Einhorn, vice chairman at Leon Cooperman's $7billion fund, said at the Reuters Global Investment Summit last week.  "A decade ago, did I and most others focus on what's going on in China? No. Now we wait for the November manufacturing index for China to come out. The day is longer because of that. I am up around 6 in the morning; I review what has gone on overnight in Asia and in Europe. I spend an hour in front of the machine at home, going through data and news releases" before he's out the door.

from Global Investing:

Tide turning for emerging currencies, local debt

November 29, 2012

Emerging market currencies have been a source of frustration for investors this year. With central banks overwhelmingly in rate-cutting mode and export growth slowing, most currencies have performed poorly. That has been a bit of a dampener for local currency debt --  while returns in dollar terms have been robust at 13 percent, currency appreciation has contributed just 1.5 percent of that, according to JP Morgan.

from Global Investing:

And the winner is — frontier market bonds

November 22, 2012

Global Investing has commented before on how strongly the world's riskiest bonds -- from the so-called frontier markets such as Mongolia, Nigeria and Guatemala -- have performed.  NEXGEM, the frontier component of the bond index family run by JP Morgan, is on track to outperform all other fixed income classes this year with returns of over 20 percent., the bank tells clients in a note today. Just to compare, broader emerging dollar bonds on the EMBI Global index have returned some 16 percent year-to-date while local currency emerging debt is up 13 percent.