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from The Great Debate:

What unites Democrats? Republicans!

Back in 1901, Finley Peter Dunne's character Mr. Dooley said, “The Dimmycratic Party ain't on speakin' terms with itsilf.” Is that happening again now? You might think so, given the talk about a populist revolt on the left.

But Democrats are in fact remarkably united on most issues. They agree on everything from increasing the minimum wage, to extending unemployment benefits to raising the debt ceiling.

Yes, there are divisions emerging over trade and energy. But it's not anything like the bitter confrontations we used to see among Democrats over civil rights and the Vietnam War. It's also not anything like the bitter civil war that's broken out in the Republican Party. No one is threatening to walk out.

The 1960s was a time of open warfare among Democrats. The party establishment faced rebellions on two fronts. The George Wallace voters on the right, who objected to the party's embrace of civil rights; and  antiwar voters on the left, who objected to the Johnson administration's war in Vietnam. The Wallace voters left the party. The antiwar movement left blood on the streets of Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, but it ultimately persuaded the party to its point of view.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

On jobs: Be bold, Obama

President Barack Obama’s State of the Union was all about jobs. He said the word 23 times, often congratulating himself on having helped create 4 million. He urged a “year of action” to make more jobs, raise wages and create opportunities for social mobility. Then he set out on a jobs tour to persuade large companies to start hiring and pay more.

But if we assume the Tea Party-dominated House of Representatives is not going to help him here and will block any new public borrowing for infrastructure projects, what is the president to do?

from The Great Debate:

On Keystone pipeline, consider Canada

The Oscar for Best Picture last month went to Argo, the Ben Affleck movie about the Canadian government’s help in spiriting U.S. diplomats out of Iran during the hostage crisis  – which  underscores the United States’ historic relationship with its closest ally, Canada. Back in the real world, however, the Obama administration is on the verge of severely damaging this strategic partnership with its poor handling of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.

The State Department’s favorable draft environmental analysis, released on Friday, should pave the way for final administration approval of the pipeline. Of course, the State Department has already gone through this process once before. Then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton deemed Keystone XL to be in the national interest – only to have President Barack Obama shelve the project in January 2012, during the run-up to his re-election campaign.

from Chrystia Freeland:

The key to the meaning of Keystone XL

Is oil like red meat or is it like tobacco? Your answer to that question determines how you feel about the North American boom in unconventional sources of fossil fuel, particularly the Canadian oil sands.

If you think oil is like tobacco, it is a strictly noxious commodity, which seriously harms its users and those around them. We should stop consuming it at once and at all costs. But if you think oil is like red meat, you take a more nuanced view. For the health of the planet, we should find greener alternatives to it whenever we can, but used wisely and in moderation it has an honorable role in the 21st-century economy.

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