from The Great Debate:

Disappearance of North Korea’s Kim Jong Un could ease path to peace, coup or no

By Paul French
October 8, 2014

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Kim Jong Un has apparently gone AWOL. His movements unknown, the reason for his sudden invisibility mysterious. Nobody in Pyongyang is saying anything. But then nobody in Pyongyang ever says very much.

from Global Investing:

Discovering Pyongyang’s view with a North Korean diplomat

May 21, 2014

Last week I went to a very unique session on North Korea which featured a rare appearance of a North Korean diplomat, at London-based policy institute Chatham House.

from Global Investing:

A guide to North Korean “elections” – due in March

January 9, 2014

Investors are bracing themselves this year for elections in all of "Fragile Five" countries and a number of other emerging nations that are adding political concerns to those economies already vulnerable to capital flight risks.

from Photographers' Blog:

Five days with my North Korean minders

August 9, 2013

Pyongyang, North Korea

By Jason Lee

From stepping on to the Air Koryo flight to Pyongyang on the evening of July 24th until my return on the 29th, I didn’t stop taking pictures. Our group from Reuters, visiting the secretive state of North Korea for its celebrations marking the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War, often found ourselves with no time to eat. It was only in the taxi on the way home from Beijing airport that I had time to think back on my trip.

from Ian Bremmer:

When hackers bully a bully: Anonymous vs Kim Jong-un

By Ian Bremmer
April 11, 2013

For an American emissary looking to have an impact, there’s no better place to visit than North Korea. Most of the world is shut out of Kim Jong-un’s country, and the U.S. government has so few levers to influence policy that any American who finds his way in will make news.

from John Lloyd:

North Korea’s known unknowns

By John Lloyd
April 8, 2013

As Donald Rumsfeld used to say, there are known unknowns. Two of them are confronting the world today, and both stem from the Korean peninsula. 

from Ian Bremmer:

The hope and beauty of a North Korean stalemate

By Ian Bremmer
March 30, 2012

President Obama’s recent trip to South Korea may have gained attention for his “open mic” slipup with outgoing Russian President Medvedev over missile defense, but that’s just a media distraction from the importance of Obama’s visit to the Korean peninsula. After Kim Jong Il’s death in December, the U.S. took an early lead in negotiations with North Korea doing so because Obama and his team thought it could be an easy diplomatic win. With the promise of aid and food, the U.S. could let new leader Kim Jong-un quietly drop the consistently belligerent stance the country has taken in what passes for its foreign policy.

from Breakingviews:

Kim Jong-un could thaw dictatorship into growth

March 1, 2012

By Martin Hutchinson

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Dear Leader’s death may prize open hermit state

December 19, 2011

By John Foley (The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own)

from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra – Bad behavior

November 22, 2010

"We will not be drawn into rewarding North Korea for bad behavior," State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said today, after revelations that the world's most reclusive state showed off its latest advances in uranium enrichment. "They frequently anticipate doing something outrageous or provocative and forcing us to jump through hoops as a result. We're not going to buy into this cycle."