from Breakingviews:

Uber driver deal just a detour from legal showdown

April 22, 2016

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Tales from the Trail:

Loves labor most: Clinton picks up endorsement, Sanders grabs volunteers

September 14, 2015

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) takes part in a rally to preserve union pensions in Washington

Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) takes part in a rally to preserve union pensions on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 10, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

from Breakingviews:

Amazon swaps more than size with Wal-Mart

By Rob Cox
August 17, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Like nails on a chalkboard: How hard-fought labor reforms have been lost

May 18, 2015

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Credit: Creative Commons

After the New York Times ran a searing two-part investigation into the exploitation and job-related health problems of the state’s nail-salon workers earlier this month, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo ordered emergency measures to protect them and appointed a special review panel to recommend long-term reforms. The Times series painted a portrait of an immigrant workforce laboring in dangerous conditions and for pitiful wages -- in some cases paying salon owners for the opportunity to make $10, or less, a day.

from Breakingviews:

Review: The shirk ethic – a user’s guide

November 28, 2014

By Martin Langfield

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from Breakingviews:

America: land of phantom job openings

November 7, 2014

By Stephanie Rogan

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

from Anatole Kaletsky:

It ain’t over yet: Last-minute promises to Scotland will scar the UK

September 26, 2014

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech at the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre in Aberdeen, Scotland

Astonishing as it was to contemplate the breakup of Europe’s most stable nation-state threatened by last week’s Scottish referendum, we now have an even more extraordinary possibility. In the days since the Scottish voters rejected secession 55 percent to 45 percent, a new threat has suddenly appeared to blight Britain’s political and economic prospects for years ahead. It now looks like Britain may be dissolved by one rogue opinion poll.

from The Great Debate:

It ain’t over yet: Last-minute promises to Scotland will scar the UK

September 26, 2014

[CROSSPOST blog: 2545 post: 1414]

Original Post Text:

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech at the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre in Aberdeen, Scotland

Astonishing as it was to contemplate the breakup of Europe’s most stable nation-state threatened by last week’s Scottish referendum, we now have an even more extraordinary possibility. In the days since the Scottish voters rejected secession 55 percent to 45 percent, a new threat has suddenly appeared to blight Britain’s political and economic prospects for years ahead. It now looks like Britain may be dissolved by one rogue opinion poll.

from The Great Debate:

It’s harder to reach the American dream if you’re reaching all alone

August 29, 2014

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“Hours of chaos” is how the New York Times described the work reality of more and more Americans. It highlighted Jannette Navarra, a Starbucks barrista, who is regularly forced to work part-time with fluctuating hours. She usually gets her work schedule three days ahead of the workweek, so she is always scrambling to arrange childcare for her son. Any hope Navarra has of advancing by pursuing a degree is shattered by her inability to schedule classes.

from Counterparties:

Reprogramming the robo-schedulers

August 15, 2014

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Flexible work hours aren’t always a good thing. Jodi Kantor made a splash with her New York Times story about Jannette Navaro, a Starbucks employee (er, “partner”) who has constant upheaval in her life thanks to her erratic work schedule. Starbucks is one of many companies that uses software to efficiently allocate employees around its stores. “This kind of work is ‘flexible’ only for the company. It means schedules and salaries vary to the point where it’s difficult for workers to make long-term plans,” writes Max Nisen. It can mean things like the “clopen,” when employees are scheduled to close the store late at night and open it again early the next morning.