from MacroScope:

Whiffs of interest rate cuts in Brazil

March 30, 2016

Brazilian Central bank chief Alexandre Tombini leaves the Economic Affairs Committee of the Senate in Brasilia December 16, 2014. Tombini repeated on Tuesday that the bank's forex intervention program has met its goals and that the current stock of swaps has fulfilled businesses' demand for currency protection. The comments raised doubts about the continuity of the bank's currency intervention into 2015. Tombini clarified, however, that the bank is currently deciding on new terms for the program that will take effect as of next year. His comments were not enough to ease investors' concerns. The real weakened further after he spoke, trading at 2.781 per dollar, nearly 2 percent weaker, as the market expected more details on the program that currently sells $200 million worth of currency swaps per day. REUTERS/Joedson Alves (BRAZIL - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS HEADSHOT) - RTR4I9C8 As impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff grows more likely, chances are rising that Brazil's central bank may also go under new management in a matter of months.

from Breakingviews:

Latam pro-business leaders face welfare conundrum

December 7, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Venezuela’s populist revolution runs out of gas

December 4, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from MacroScope:

Jobs at risk as Latin America’s downturn deepens

November 5, 2015

Laid-off outsourced worker, who was contracted to work for Petrobras, wears a mask of former Brazilian president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva during a protest against recent layoffs, in front of the Petrobras headquarter in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Millions of Latin Americans risk losing their jobs as a consequence of the region's economic downturn. Job losses are already piling up in Brazil, mired in its worst recession in generations, and look increasingly likely in other countries, according to a research report by UBS.

from The Great Debate:

Pope Francis’ relationship to a movement that divided Latin America

September 24, 2015

Pope Francis is surrounded by greeting children next to Bolivia's President Evo Morales after his arrival in El Alto

Pope Francis (L) is surrounded by greeting children next to Bolivia's President Evo Morales after his arrival in El Alto, Bolivia, July 8, 2015. REUTERS/David Mercado

from MacroScope:

Rate hikes are coming… in Latin America

September 17, 2015

Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen prepares to testify before a House Financial Services committee hearing on Capitol Hill at in Washington

Latin American central banks are watching today's Federal Reserve meeting very closely. Some are ready to raise their own interest rates, even if Yellen does not pull the trigger now.

from MacroScope:

Stronger dollar still set to fuel inflation in Latin America, despite weak growth

September 10, 2015

A customer selects bananas as others buy goods at a fruit and vegetable store in CaracasFor months, Latin America's inflation has been surprisingly steady given the steep drop of their currencies. Weak growth helped curb prices - but that may be about to change.

from The Great Debate:

Why Mexican billionaire Ricardo Salinas thinks drugs should be legalized

July 9, 2015

A group of protesters set fire to the wooden door of Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto's ceremonial palace during a protest denouncing the apparent massacre of 43 trainee teachers, in the historic center of Mexico City

A group of protesters set fire to the wooden door of Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto's ceremonial palace during a protest in Mexico City, November 8, 2014. Protesters were demanding justice for 43 students who were abducted and apparently murdered and incinerated by corrupt police in league with drug gang members in September. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

from MacroScope:

Commodity sell-off adds pressure on unpopular Latin American leaders

July 8, 2015

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff (C) and Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto (2nd R) surrounded by security arrive for the family photo of the VII Summit of the Americas in Panama City

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff is fighting for political survival less than a year after being re-elected. Several reasons have been pointed exhaustively to explain how things got so bad in such a short period of time: chief among them are the burgeoning corruption scandal at state-run Petrobras and stubbornly high inflation, out of sync with the rest of the world.

from MacroScope:

Brazil gets a vote of confidence

April 7, 2015

Boys play soccer on a driftwood soccer court, on the banks of the Rio Negro or Black River in Catalao community near Manaus

Shorting Brazil is no longer the favorite sport of analysts and traders, judging by recent market trends and comments.