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from The Great Debate:

For Biden, Mexico’s endless allure

Vice President Joe Biden recently canceled the Panama leg of his trip to Latin America, citing the need to be in Washington, focusing on Syria. He did not, however, cancel his visit to Mexico.

Biden arrived in Mexico late Thursday night and is due to meet with President Enrique Peña Nieto, and kick off the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue (HLED). There were plenty of reasons for the vice president to stay home -- including the brewing budget battle, and the shootings in Washington's Navy Yard -- in addition to Syria. So it is worth asking why he didn't.

Biden had both political and economic reasons to visit Mexico. On the political front, he is seeking to strengthen his credibility with the businesses that can benefit from strengthened trade and investment with Mexico. But perhaps Biden’s most important reason is the power of Latino voters. The 2012 election made it clear that any viable Republican presidential candidate would need to win the support of close to 40 percent of Latino voters. President George W. Bush did this in 2004; Mitt Romney got 27 percent last year.

The corollary, of course, is that a Democrat needs around 60 percent of the Latino vote to win the White House. Should Biden decide to run in 2016, his credibility with Latino voters is likely to be strengthened by a focus on relations with Latin America in general and Mexico in particular -- given that 63 percent of U.S. Latinos are either originally from Mexico or their families are. This is, in fact, the vice president’s second trip to Mexico, and third trip to Latin America, in a year.

from The Great Debate:

The GOP’s immigration problem

Old vaudeville joke:

Man goes to the doctor.  Says he has a pain in his arm.

“Have you ever had this problem before?” the doctor says.

“Yes,” the man answers.

"Well, you got it again.”

Bada-bing.

Now look at the Republicans' immigration problem. Have they had this problem before? Yes. Well, they've got it again.

Republicans had an immigration problem nearly 100 years ago. A huge wave of immigrants from southern and eastern Europe – Poles, Hungarians, Italians, Jews – came to this country during the first two decades of the 20th century, before strict national quotas were imposed in 1924. These immigrants were largely Catholic and Jewish.

from The Great Debate:

Seeking consensus on immigration, guns

Two tough issues — immigration reform and gun control. “It won’t be easy,” President Barack Obama said about gun control in December, “but that’s no excuse not to try.”   Tuesday, he said about immigration reform: “The closer we get, the more emotional this debate is going to become.”

Which does he stand a better chance of winning?  Answer: immigration. On immigration, Obama has Democrats strongly behind him. Republicans are divided — and freaked out by the issue. On guns, he’s got Republicans strongly against him. Democrats are divided — and freaked out by the issue.

from The Great Debate:

To see future electorate, look at California voters now

The changing face of the American electorate is etched all over the map of California. The Golden State may no longer be a partisan battleground, but it continues to be a reliable bellwether for the evolving national political landscape.

Even as President Barack Obama won a second term with an electorate that mirrored the demographic trends that have made California deep blue, Golden State voters chose to raise taxes to fund education and gave Democrats a two-thirds “supermajority” in both houses of the state legislature—meaning Democratic lawmakers will have the ability to raise taxes without a single Republican vote.

from The Great Debate:

Where Karl Rove was right

Give Karl Rove a break. His meltdown on election night may not have been entirely about Fox News prematurely calling Ohio for President Barack Obama. After all, the poor guy had every right to get upset while watching the Republican Party nominee’s campaign crash and burn.

For all intents and purposes, Mitt Romney trampled on Rove’s once vaunted GOP playbook -- and leaves a weakened GOP in his wake.

from Tales from the Trail:

Election shines light on long path to post-racial America

So much for post-racial.

Supporters watch as U.S. President Barack Obama celebrates his re-election during his election night rally in Chicago, Nov. 7, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Supporters watch as U.S. President Barack Obama celebrates his re-election during his election night rally in Chicago, Nov. 7, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

When President Barack Obama won his historic bid for the U.S. presidency in 2008 as the nation's first black president, there was a lot of talk about a new era for America.

from Bernd Debusmann:

Does Paul Ryan mean Romney has already lost the Latino vote?

Has Mitt Romney, the U.S. Republican Party's candidate for November's presidential elections, given up hope of boosting his dismal standing among U.S. citizens of Latin American extraction? The question arises after Romney's pick of a running mate of no apparent appeal to Latinos.

Romney's choice as candidate for Vice President, the ultra-conservative congressman Paul Ryan, is a darling of the Republican Party's rigidly ideological base but has done nothing that could endear him to the fastest growing segment of the American electorate. On average, around 1,600 Latinos turn 18, voting age, every day and by November 6, some 22 million will be eligible to vote.

from The Great Debate:

The GOP’s hunt for Latino voters

Jon Huntsman suspended more than just his campaign this week. He also put an end to any hope the GOP had of making strides in the Latino community.

And despite the stereotypes, because of the Obama administration's policies, there really was hope. The administration has increased the number of deportations to nearly 400,000 people a year since taking office, according to ABC News. Likewise, in Secretary Janet Napolitano’s annual report to Congress, she describes the Department of Homeland Security’s efforts to be at “record highs.” President Obama's first term has featured twice the number of deportations as George W. Bush's by instituting a systematic approach to immigration enforcement not seen since the infamous days of “Operation Wetback,” a program in which President Dwight Eisenhower deported over a million Mexican nationals, among them American citizens.

from Reuters Money:

Why don’t blacks save more?

A sales clerk at the Best Buy electronics store counts money for a purchase in Westbury, New York November 27, 2009.    REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton   Yet another survey confirms what we already know: Blacks don't save as much as their white counterparts.

According to Prudential's new study -- the African American Financial Experience -- 60 percent of African-Americans have less than $50,000 in company retirement plans and only 23 percent have more than $100,000. They're also three times more likely to raid their 401(k) or other retirement plans to meet immediate financial needs, the study says.

from Tales from the Trail:

In California, no voting bloc is safe

First Republican Meg Whitman, a political novice running for California governor, seemed to catch her Democratic opponent, MegJerry Brown, napping with an aggressive early push for Latino voters --  a voting bloc that has proven tough for her party to crack.  

Whitman has run a series of Spanish-language TV commercials and billboards that, according to the latest p0lls, paid off with a 14-point gain among Latinos -- despite the still simmering furor over a crackdown on illegal immigrants in neighborhing Arizona that was signed into law by Republican  Governor Jan Brewer.

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