from The Great Debate:

Banks thrive, while homeowners still suffer

By Mark Ladov
February 20, 2013

A year ago the federal government and 49 states completed a $25 billion agreement with the nation’s largest mortgage servicers to settle claims of “robo-signing” and unlawful foreclosure practices. President Barack Obama announced the creation of the federal-state mortgage securities working group in his 2012 State of the Union address. The nation seemed on the verge of transforming the way banks treat struggling homeowners ‑ particularly those with “underwater” mortgages, in which a homeowner owes more than the house is worth.

from MacroScope:

Lenders still overvaluing properties, Fed study finds

March 15, 2012

The Fed calls it an “apparent misunderstanding.” Whatever term you prefer, a new Cleveland Fed study makes one thing clear: lenders are still overstating home values. The study focuses on real-estate-owned or REO inventory, which covers properties that are now owned by lenders.

from Edward Hadas:

Mr. Fine Suit visits Europe

By Edward Hadas
November 30, 2011

Once upon a time there were 11 prosperous merchants who lived in a land of peace and plenty. They decided to form a league that would work together for everyone’s greater good. But then a charming man in a fine suit came around with a tempting speech: “I love your project and trust your businesses. I will lend you money at a very attractive interest rate”. How nice, thought the merchants. Our customers will love us if we use the money we borrow to give them better deals.

from Financial Regulatory Forum:

U.S. credit market remains uneasy in the world of representations and warranties

By Guest Contributor
October 12, 2011

US dollar note and other currenciesBy Alex Lee

NEW YORK, Oct. 12 (Business Law Currents) - The first half of 2011 saw rebounding credit markets and an uptick in debt issuance. Due to uncertain economic conditions in the second half of 2011, however, even the most fundamental aspects of loan documentation are facing increasing scrutiny. Representations & warranties that were more routine and non-contentious transformed into significantly stricter provisions as a result of the credit crisis.

from Entrepreneurial:

Exclusive: Fewer small businesses shopping for credit: PayNet

June 6, 2011

When the financial crisis hit, panicked small businesses were scrambling to find credit. Nearly three years later it’s a much different story.

from Breakingviews:

Crisis forgotten in bond-buying frenzy

April 2, 2010

Lenders do not seem to be good learners. To judge from the credit market, the 2008-9 crisis might never have happened. Perhaps this is the healthy fading of traumatic memories, but the current buying frenzy looks more like a return to an old bad habit.

from Commentaries:

Goldman’s “True Blood” moment

July 13, 2009

matthewgoldstein-Matthew Goldstein is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.-

Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein has an image problem on his hands.

The most ardent critics of his firm are likening it to a blood-sucking vampire, while others simply see the Wall Street investment bank as a greedy and ruthless financial titan. But there is a way for Blankfein to start turning public opinion around, and that involves a quick buyout of ailing mid-market lender CIT Group, which provides financing to some retailers, manufacturers and aviation operators.

from The Great Debate UK:

Goldman’s “True Blood” moment

July 13, 2009

[CROSSPOST blog: 1381 post: 1137]

Original Post Text:
matthewgoldstein-Matthew Goldstein is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.-

from The Great Debate UK:

Porsche must get itself back on autobahn

June 8, 2009

alexander-smith-- Alexander Smith is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Porsche and Volkswagen gave themselves four weeks to come up with a blueprint for "an integrated car manufacturing group".

from UK News:

Little substance to mortgage lenders “help” for borrowers

June 4, 2008

houses2.jpgThe trade body for the mortgage industry has written to the Chancellor of the Exchequer. In its letter to Alistair Darling, the Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML) outlines the range of steps that lenders are, apparently, taking to minimise problems borrowers may face in the wake of the credit crunch -- and help limit the number of property repossessions. Its members have committed to four "significant specific measures". These are, in the CML's own words: