from The Great Debate UK:

It is clear Britain got a ‘bounce’ from the Olympics, but much more is needed to secure long-term economic legacy

By Guest Contributor
January 28, 2013

--Andrew Hammond is an Associate Partner at ReputationInc.  He was formerly a UK Government Special Adviser, and a Senior Consultant at Oxford Analytica. The opinions expressed are his own.--

from The Great Debate UK:

We need an ‘Economics Team GB’ to secure London 2012 legacy

By Guest Contributor
September 11, 2012

--Andrew Hammond is an Associate Partner at ReputationInc, and was formerly a UK Government Special Adviser, and Senior Consultant at Oxford Analytica. The opinions expressed are his own.--

from MediaFile:

Data shows thousands circumvented NBC Olympics coverage

August 13, 2012

At least one company benefited from Olympics fans in the United States who tried to circumvent NBC's television coverage during the London Games. AnchorFree, the Mountain View, Calif.-based startup released data to Reuters on Monday showing a major bump in users who installed a product that gives U.S. users an anonymous IP address in the United Kingdom. Presumably the people who signed up for the product, called ExpatShield, used it to watch BBC's online streams of the Olympics.

from Photographers' Blog:

Click, edit, crop or drop

August 10, 2012

By Russell Boyce

Being a picture editor for a wire agency at the London 2012 Olympics is like being a referee at a title-deciding football match. If everything goes well no one really notices you; but one big mistake and you are the most hated person in the stadium. If you call it wrong and miss the picture that captures the vivid moment of sporting agony or ecstasy you risk the jeers and frustrations of the whole team. The reward? A good picture editor has the chance to select that defining picture, the shot that the photographer doesn’t even know he or she has taken, or to crop a frame that changes a good picture into a great one.

from Photographers' Blog:

Shooting through the Olympic flame

August 10, 2012

By Max Rossi

In one word: a nightmare!

From my top position above the flame I have to fight with it every day and the results are both frustrating and exciting. Frustrating when a nice celebration or action are completely blurred by the heat, exciting when the heat and the composition of the picture work well together.

from Photographers' Blog:

Gold, silver and bronze

August 9, 2012

By Eddie Keogh

My colleagues now call me the medal man. No, I’ve never won one or even got close but during the 9 days of athletics at the Olympic Stadium in London one of my jobs is to photograph every athlete that wins a medal. The unbridled joy is evident in most cases. Years of blood, sweat and tears have come to fruition and occasionally the emotion of the moment and the playing of their national anthem will bring a tear to the toughest of men and women.

from The Observatory:

The science of performance

By Curtis Brainard
August 8, 2012

Does sex diminish athletic vigor? Does athletic tape enhance it? These are just a few of the questions that one Reuters correspondent has sought to answer amidst the toil, tears, and sweat at the Summer Olympics in London.

from The Great Debate UK:

Why enhanced reputation could be the real legacy for Britain of London 2012

By Guest Contributor
August 8, 2012

Andrew Hammond is an Associate Partner at Reputation Inc, and formerly a UK Government Special Adviser and Senior Consultant at Oxford Analytica. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Photographers' Blog:

Attempting to shoot the moon

August 6, 2012

By Luke MacGregor

With very little understanding of astronomy but with the aid of a phone app, I began a three evening attempt to capture the moon with the Olympic Rings. The rings have been hanging iconically on Tower Bridge for the London 2012 Olympic Games and it was suggested to me that a full moon should - at the right angle - cross through them.

from Photographers' Blog:

18 hour days at the Olympics

August 3, 2012

By Dominic Ebenbichler

The alarm clock was set for 7.15am. After a short breakfast with my colleague Damir Sagolj I took the bus to Wimbledon, a journey of about 1.5 hours.