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Reuters blog archive

from Photographers' Blog:

The teachings of Mao

Sitong, China

By Carlos Barria

In a remote farming area of China’s central province of Henan, kids are roused from their warm beds at 5 a.m. as revolutionary songs play over the loudspeaker system. In the freezing morning they gather around a cement courtyard for their morning exercises.

Mr. Xia Zuhai, principal of the Democracy Elementary and Middle school -- where the curriculum stresses the teachings of China’s late Chairman Mao Zedong -- blows his whistle and encourages the students while they run around in the darkness for 20 minutes.

Then, the children enter a cold classroom where a big portrait of Chairman Mao is seen on the wall, decked out with colorful balloons in preparation for the 120th anniversary of Mao's birth on Dec. 26.

Teacher's aide Xia Jingjing starts the two-hour lecture reciting quotations from Mao Zedong's famed 'Little Red Book' before breakfast.

from Russell Boyce:

Asia – A week in pictures 03 July 2011

A great news picture has to have the WOW factor and without a doubt the picture of the domb disposal expert being caught in a car bomb blast is amazing. What is even more amazing is that he lived.

A car bomb explodes as a member of a Thai bomb squad checks it in Narathiwat province, south of Bangkok July 1, 2011. The bomb planted by suspected insurgents wounded the squad member, police said.  REUTERS/Stringer 

from Global News Journal:

China’s elusive land reform

It is ironic that 30 years after they gave birth to the reforms that transformed China into an economic powerhouse, the country's vast hinterlands are still dogged by poverty.

The breathtaking growth of the economy since the pro-market reforms launched by Deng Xiaoping has led to an extraordinary increase in real living standards and an unprecedented decline in poverty. According to World Bank estimates, more than 60 percent of the population lived under the $1 per day poverty line at the beginning of economic reform. This had fallen to 10 percent by 2004, so - on this narrow measure at least - about 500 million people were lifted out of poverty in a single generation.

from Pakistan: Now or Never?:

Pakistan’s lawyers: recovering from the anti-climax

Lawyers protest in Rawalpindi/Mohsin RazaWith hindsight, it seems clear that a mass movement named after Mao's Long March but also claiming Gandhi's principles of non-violence risked disappointing its supporters.  The failure of the Long March by Pakistan's lawyers to restore judges sacked by President Pervez Musharraf, and its dispersal last Saturday, has prompted much debate about why its leaders gave up without at least staging a sit-in.

Defence analyst Ikram Sehgal called the Long March a logistical success in its ability to garner mass support without violence, but a tactical failure. "The tactical failure of this long-lasting tremendous effort founded on great principles has become a strategic disaster for Musharraf's opponents," he writes in The News.  "About Pervez Musharraf, 'with such friends who needs enemies', one can paraphrase the saying for him: 'With such enemies why does he need friends?'"

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