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from MacroScope:

Central bank independence is a bit like marriage: Israel’s Fischer

For Bank of Israel governor Stanley Fischer, this week’s high-powered macroeconomics conference at the International Monetary Fund was a homecoming of sorts. After all, he was the IMF’s first deputy managing director from 1994 to 2001. The familiar nature of his surroundings may have helped inspire Fischer to use a household analogy to describe the vaunted but often ethereal principle of central bank independence.

Fischer, a vice chairman at Citigroup between 2002 and 2005, sought to answer a question posed by conference organizers: If central banks are in charge of monetary policy, financial supervision and macroprudential policy, should we rethink central bank independence?  His take: “The answer is yes.”

In particular, the veteran policymaker, who advised Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke on his PhD thesis at MIT, argued various degrees of independence should be afforded to different functions within a central bank.

While monetary policy should be more insulated – though it is not always – from politics, it might be appropriate for the financial stability function to entail greater coordination with fiscal authorities, as is the case in Israel. Which is where marriage comes in:

from India Insight:

Happily single in India? Don’t count on it

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily of Reuters)

"Are you a student or are you working?" asked a middle-aged woman who squeezed herself into the space between me and another in the women-only coach on a Delhi Metro train.

from India Insight:

Fear, too busy, too ugly: why India’s famous bachelors stay single

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily of Reuters)

A man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and they will become one flesh.

from Tales from the Trail:

Married v. unmarried could be the new election “gender gap”

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Despite the American obsession with voting differences between men and women - the famed U.S. election "gender gap" - there is a far bigger "gap" dividing likely voters in 2012 - the yawning divide between marrieds and unmarrieds.

Fifty-seven percent of likely voters who are unmarried support Democratic President Barack Obama in the Nov. 6 general election, including those who have never been married, live with a partner or are widowed, divorced or separated.

from Photographers' Blog:

City of joy

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By Rupak de Chowdhuri

It’s festive time in Kolkata, with the Durga festival celebrated across the city, before Diwali celebrations fill the city with light. Kolkata has been called the "City of Joy," a title which was immortalized in a book by Dominique Lapierre. It tells the story of the poorest of the poor who still somehow find hope and joy in life. Little did I know I was about to come face-to-face with such a story.

I hunt for pictures every day. One day, I was looking for pictures when an old friend told me to go to a place where I was guaranteed to find a good story. Because of my curious nature, I started to walk in search of the story I’d been told about in the middle of Kolkata. I started searching among the food stalls because I wouldn’t believe it until I saw them myself.

from Reuters Money:

Married or single? Who has the advantage in retirement planning?

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"I told you so."

Those are the four words no spouse wants to hear from their partner, especially when it comes to investing and retirement planning.

Just ask Dr. David Rothberg. Rothberg, 59, and his wife heavily invested in tech giant Cisco way back in the mid-1990s. She wanted to shift money into bonds instead. But that's not Rothberg's style: "I’m an aggressive investor, and the market was going up 30 percentage points per year, so why would I invest in something that would get us six percent?"

from Photographers' Blog:

Married as minors

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A year ago I traveled to Rajasthan, a state in northwestern India, to photograph child marriages. Minors in India continue to be forced into matrimony despite a ban by the central government. In fact, several children below the legal age tie the knot in mass ceremonies during the Hindu festival of Akshaya Tritiya, considered one of the most auspicious days in the Hindu calendar.

Almost a year later, I was asked to go back to Rajasthan and photograph a child couple whose marriage I had documented earlier. The couple were 14-year-old Kishan Gopal and his 12-year-old wife Krishna. With the help of a few friends, I tracked down the village and the groom's house. I wasn’t sure if the parents and the couple would allow me to photograph them again. With a lot of apprehension, I reached the house of the child groom.

from Photographers' Blog:

When monkeys tie the knot

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It all started with a phone call. I was being invited to a wedding. Sounded good. I'd finally make my debut in wedding photography.

I had it all planned. I wanted to spend a day each at the groom's and the bride’s respectively. Now the only hiccup was I couldn’t interact with them. After all, they were no regular couple. They were monkeys.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Boy, this comes as quite a surprise…

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I am in the wrong damned business. I need to get one of those sweet gigs doing scientific "studies."

But it has to be just the right "study," where the results back up what everybody already thinks. If your "study" rocks the boat, then people take a closer look and find out you spent your whole grant on remodeling your guest bathroom, and you're in trouble.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Bride pride? Taking to the bridal path…

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Blog Guy, I was surprised to read your item about that Bridesmaid Festival. Are there any other examples of wedding nostalgia events you're aware of?

Sure. Over in the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk they just had their annual "Parade of Brides," where 100 young married women took part in the event to relive their wedding day.

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