from The Great Debate:

Why work with India’s new leader? It’s the economy, stupid

By Anja Manuel
September 29, 2014

India's Prime Minister Modi gestures while speaking at Madison Square Garden in New York

Great powers sneak up on you.  While Washington has been preoccupied with a burning Middle East, Russia behaving badly and, to a lesser extent, the rise of China, U.S. relations with India have slipped down the diplomatic priority list. In coming decades, however, enormous, unwieldy India will likely be the United States’ most important continental partner in Asia.

from The Great Debate:

Despite stimulus, middle class still struggles

By Mitch McConnell
February 17, 2014

Five years ago Monday, President Barack Obama signed the signature economic proposal of his presidency, saying that the passage of the $787 billion economic stimulus package heralded the “the beginning of the end” of the Great Recession.

from The Great Debate:

The middle class’s missing $1.6 trillion

By Charles R. Morris
February 13, 2014

The United States was the world’s first middle-class nation, which was a big factor in its rapid growth.  Mid-19th-century British travelers marveled at American workers’ “ductility of mind and the readiness…for a new thing” and admired how hard and willingly they labored. Abraham Lincoln attributed it the knowledge that “humblest man [had] an equal chance to get rich with everyone else.”

from The Edgy Optimist:

The real future of U.S. manufacturing

By Zachary Karabell
January 17, 2014

Few topics have been more fraught than the fate of U.S. manufacturing. The sharp loss of manufacturing jobs since 2008 has triggered legitimate concern that America’s best days may have passed.

from The Great Debate:

IRS at 100: How income taxation built the middle class

By John Buenker and Sam Pizzigati
October 2, 2013

Exactly a century ago, on October 3, 1913, President Woodrow Wilson signed the first modern federal income tax into law. The sky did not fall.

from The Great Debate:

The real student loan crisis

By Robert Hiltonsmith
August 1, 2013

A month has passed since Congress allowed interest rates on federal student loans to double for some borrowers, increasing the cost of their college educations by as much as $4,500. While the debate continues to focus on the interest rate for future borrowers, it is ignoring the larger problem with student debt: the more than $1 trillion that had already been borrowed before the interest rate debate. This existing debt will continue to drag down borrowers’ financial security, which in turn drags down the entire economy. By how much? Demos, the public policy group where I work, has just released a study that estimates the economic impact of the existing student debt burden, and finds that it may cost the country more than $4 trillion in lost economic activity.

from The Great Debate:

Obama’s Plan: One Nation, Under Government

By Keith Koffler
July 25, 2013

You’ve probably read that the series of speeches President Barack Obama started giving Wednesday are a “pivot” to the economy designed to rev things up. Well, they’re not. Obama’s speeches will be no less than the manifesto of a leftist president who plans to spend his remaining time in office installing as much of his big government “project” as possible by whatever means he can get away with.

from Chrystia Freeland:

Mysteries of the middle class

By Chrystia Freeland
June 28, 2013

If you are worried about the Western middle class - and we all should be - you may have started to have some doubts about the virtues of flexible labor markets. In theory, flexible labor markets should make our economies more productive, and all of us richer, by making it easier for people to do the work the economy needs and to stop doing the work it doesn't.

from Chrystia Freeland:

Matriarchy, patriarchy and the masters of the universe

By Chrystia Freeland
May 31, 2013

The past week has underscored one more way in which the lives of the super-rich are diverging from the lives of everyone else: The middle class is becoming a matriarchy, while the plutocracy remains firmly patriarchal.

from Chrystia Freeland:

Twilight of the middle class?

By Chrystia Freeland
April 26, 2013

It's evening in America. That is the worrying news from the latest Heartland Monitor Poll, conducted quarterly and sponsored by the insurer Allstate and National Journal.