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from Photographers' Blog:

Uneasy life of China’s migrants

Shanghai, China

By Aly Song

Living in the metropolis of Shanghai for over 10 years, it makes sense to me that all the luxury malls, high-end goods and soaring skyscrapers are made by the hands of migrant workers. As a result, I pay extra attention to the migrant worker community.

Shortly after the Spring Festival holiday, I had a chance to photograph dozens of migrant workers traveling from home to job interviews at an underwear factory in Shanghai. They were all recruited by an employment agency, a popular business nowadays especially on the coastal area where the labor shortage situation has reached a worsening level.

The interview was the simplest I had ever seen, the only requirement by the factory was “good health”, followed by several questions which altogether lasted about 5 minutes. Afterwards the workers were divided into two groups – experienced and “whiteboard” (without any work experience). The experienced workers were asked to start working right away, while the whiteboard workers needed to attend a training course – by observing the production line and following a veteran for one or two days.

There were two “whiteboard” girls that caught my eye during the assignment. The two shy girls in their 20s were both ethnic Yi minorities from a village in southwestern China’s Yunnan province. You could almost see in their eyes that everything was so new and strange to them. They wouldn't give me their names, but they told me that it was their first time leaving home for work, and it brought them to a city over 2,000 kilometers (1,243 miles) away.

from Photographers' Blog:

The long trip home

Shanghai, China

By Carlos Barria

There was not much emotion left after crossing central China on a 50-hour train and bus journey. Just a soft touch on the face and a forced hug was all that Li Jiangzhon and his sister Li Jiangchun got from their parents after a long year of absence.

They are just one story among millions of Chinese migrant workers, who have to leave their loved ones behind to look for a better future for themselves and their families.

from Full Focus:

Migrant migration

Photographer Carlos Barria crosses central China on a 50-hour train and bus journey from Shanghai to document one couple's story. The couple, Li Anhua and Shi Huaju, are among millions of Chinese migrant workers who have to leave their loved ones behind to look for a better future for them and their families. Read Carlos's personal account of the journey here.

from Changing China:

Roller disco lives on in China

I just discovered roller disco in China! The oh so 1980s disco craze is still rolling on in China due to a huge following from the country's masses of migrant workers.

On a regular weeknight, the Xinxiang roller skating rink in one of Shanghai's less fancy districts is teeming with crowds of young migrant workers, mostly in their 20s.

from Royston Chan:

Roller disco lives on in China

I just discovered roller disco in China! The oh so 1980s disco craze is still rolling on in China due to a huge following from the country's masses of migrant workers.

On a regular weeknight, the Xinxiang roller skating rink in the one of the Shanghai's less fancy districts is teeming with crowds of young migrant workers, mostly in their 20s.

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