from The Great Debate:

Israel’s Iron Dome missile-defense system is an ironclad success

By Uzi Rubin
August 5, 2014

An interception of a rocket by the Iron Dome anti-missile system is seen above Sderot

While the troops of Israel's Air Defense Command are blasting Grad and Fajr rockets shot from Gaza out of the sky with success, there are an obsessive few who try to blast Iron Dome's evident achievements into oblivion. They insist on trivializing the missile-defense system’s rock-solid record because the facts don’t fit their theory that no missile defense system can ever work.RELATED COLUMNS David Axe: Israel's Iron Dome is more like an iron sieve EDITOR: Two views of Iron Dome's success in IsraelThe chief Iron Dome scold is Ted Postol of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a professor with academic standing but no experience in designing or managing the development of modern missile systems. He postulates that missile defense is innately belligerent and as quixotic as "the idea that a nuclear war can be won" but admits that the public would not  readily agree with his views. He casts missile defense as irretrievably faulty and wasteful, with Iron Dome -- the product Israeli technical savvy and U.S. defense funds -- squarely in his sights.

from The Great Debate:

Israel’s Iron Dome is more like an iron sieve

By David Axe
July 25, 2014

An Iron Dome launcher fires an interceptor rocket in Ashdod

Israel's vaunted Iron Dome defense system is more like an iron sieve. It fails to destroy all but a few of the rockets that Hamas and other Palestinian militant groups fire at Israeli communities. But Israel’s early-warning civil-defense systems have proved highly effective.RELATED COLUMNS Uzi Rubin: Iron Dome is an ironclad success

from The Great Debate:

Let’s end bogus missile defense testing

By Yousaf Butt
July 16, 2013

Immediately following the Fourth of July fireworks, the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) tried out some fireworks of its own. By trying to hit a missile with a missile they attempted a demonstration of the defensive “shield,” designed to protect the U.S. from North Korean and Iranian nuclear missiles. It turned out to be a dud. As with the two previous attempts, the Ground Based Missile Defense system once again failed. This failure happened despite the fact that the demonstration was essentially rigged: the intercept team knew ahead of time when to expect the incoming missile and all its relevant flight parameters. Such luxury is obviously not available in real-life combat. But even if the $214 million “test” had worked it would not prove much.

from The Great Debate:

Why Russia won’t deal on NATO missile defense

By Yousaf Butt
June 17, 2013

President Barack Obama meets with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in Mexico, June 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

from Tales from the Trail:

The First Draft: Missile defense, Iran and value voters

September 18, 2009

President Barack Obama's decision to abandon a big, fixed-installation missile defense shield in Eastern Europe is drawing some angry reaction abroad.

from Tales from the Trail:

Do-over on missile defense — reading between the lines

September 17, 2009

President Barack Obama's new missile defense plan is an exercise in reading between the lines.

from Tales from the Trail:

What’s the view? Obama’s “new approach” on missile defense

September 17, 2009

President Barack Obama used "new approach" a couple of times to describe a shift in U.S. missile defense policy, but his statement was so steeped in diplo-speak that it led to much initial head-scratching over what was actually new and different. OBAMA/

from Tales from the Trail:

The First Draft: Obama scaling back European missile shield

September 17, 2009

President Barack Obama is abandoning a Bush administration plan to build a big, fixed U.S. missile defense in Eastern Europe.

from Tales from the Trail:

The First Draft: Friday, Nov. 5

December 5, 2008

Detroit CEOs drive their hybrid cars over to the House of Representatives for another serving of humble pie this morning. But it's still not clear if they'll get the $34 billion bailout they're looking for, as several senators remained skeptical after yesterday's testimony on that side of the Capitol. 
     
Testimony before the House Financial Services Committee begins at 9:30 a.m. 

from Global News Journal:

Russia’s Cold War anger over U.S. shield: misjudged?

July 10, 2008

Signing of missile defence treaty

Russia's angry response to an accord between Washington and Prague on building part of a U.S. missile defence shield in the Czech Republic is reminiscent of the rhetoric of the Cold War. Although Russian President Dmitry Medvedev says Moscow still wants talks on the missile shield, his Foreign Ministry has threatened a "military-technical" response if the shield is deployed.