from The Great Debate:

The real problem for Republicans: Too much money

By Bill Schneider
May 4, 2015

GOP_combo

Left to right: Jeb Bush, Scott Walker, Rand Paul, Ted Cruz

Republicans have a problem for 2016: Too much money.

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush expects to raise $100 million by the end of this month. Senator Ted Cruz of Texas raised $31 million in one week. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida pulled in $40 million in pledges. Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker expects to raise $25 million by the end of June. As many as 14 other potential Republican candidates have also been busy raking in the dough.

from The Great Debate:

Republicans talk about inequality. But how serious are they?

By Bill Schneider
January 20, 2015

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell stand at a ceremony to posthumously present the Congressional Gold Medal to Raoul Wallenberg in Washington

President Barack Obama is laying down his marker Tuesday with his State of the Union Address. He told a closed-door meeting of Senate Democrats last week, “I'm not going to spend the next two years on defense. I'm going to play offense.”

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Can I invert myself and not pay taxes?

By Nicholas Wapshott
August 13, 2014

The Pfizer logo is seen at their world headquarters in New York

The hot tax-dodging business trend of the summer is inversion. A U.S. company buys a company in a country with a lower corporate tax rate, relocates its headquarters there and funnels its income through the new head office. As long as it does not repatriate profits, the self-exiled company can avoid paying U.S. corporate taxes.

from Stories I’d like to see:

More questions for Snowden and the GOP establishment takes on the 2016 primaries

By Steven Brill
June 3, 2014

Accused government whistleblower Snowden is seen on a screen as he speaks via videoconference with members of the Committee on legal Affairs and Human Rights of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe in Strasbourg

1. Snowden questions NBC missed:

In his interview with NBC’s Brian Williams last week, Edward Snowden tried to bolster his credentials this way: “I was trained as a spy in sort of the traditional sense of the word -- in that I lived and worked undercover, overseas, pretending to work in a job … and even being assigned a name that was not mine …. Now, the government might deny these things. They might frame it in certain ways, and say, ‘Oh, well, you know, he's a low-level analyst.’”

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Message for Clinton: Look before you leap

By Nicholas Wapshott
January 28, 2014

There seems to be a rush to get former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to declare her run for the presidency.

from The Great Debate:

But can the GOP revise the party?

By Bill Schneider
August 21, 2013

The temptation for political parties to rewrite the rules after every defeat is irresistible. The Republican National Committee did not resist when it met in Boston last weekend. The committee passed a resolution aimed at limiting and controlling the 2016 primary debates.

from The Great Debate:

Can Christie tackle the partisan divide?

By Bill Schneider
June 10, 2013

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie in Asbury Park in New Jersey, May 28, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Reed

from The Great Debate:

Right-wing talk shows turned White House blue

By Paul Goldman and Mark J. Rozell
April 11, 2013

Talk isn’t cheap, as Republicans have learned. The conservative talk show culture is proving expensive for GOP presidential hopefuls.

from The Great Debate:

Obama’s Two Choices: Good and Better

By Keith Koffler
February 26, 2013

President Barack Obama must like the view from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue right now. Politically speaking, the sky is clear, and the few clouds on the horizon have silver linings.

from The Great Debate:

Dems shouldn’t mess with Texas

By Grover G. Norquist and Patrick Gleason
January 31, 2013

 

There has been much ado lately about the Democratic Party’s new project to turn Texas blue. What’s lost on the liberals in D.C., California and Manhattan who will throw money at this futile effort, however, is that the Texas Republican Party is different and far stronger than its counterparts in other states. And it’s not just because the Lone Star State under Republican control has become the envy of the nation in terms of job creation and economic growth.