from The Great Debate:

Everything is negotiable in Egypt

By Stephanie Thomas
August 30, 2013

As Egypt’s military-led government appears to be solidifying its gains, and Cairo largely succumbs to its harsh measures, talk of civil war has, for now, abated. One big reason for this is because in Egypt everything is negotiable.

from John Lloyd:

What’s next for the Muslim Brotherhood?

By John Lloyd
August 22, 2013

CAIRO – The Muslim Brotherhood is on the run.

Its leaders, including its Supreme Guide, Mohamed Badie, are in prison. Badie’s only son, Ammar, was killed during the military’s clearing of protests last week. Badie’s deputy, Mahmout Ezzat replaced him, and is apparently free for now, but others are imprisoned or sought for arrest. Its protestors have been scattered by police and the army, losing hundreds of lives in the process. The cancellation of its legal status is now being discussed by the military-backed government. Former President Hosni Mubarak’s release on Thursday, from jail to house arrest, is salt in a wound. As they fall from the heights of leadership, so the old and reviled leader climbs, if shakily, out of the pit.

from John Lloyd:

General Sisi: An enigma without a dogma

By John Lloyd
August 19, 2013

CAIRO -- The man who presently rules Egypt, General Abdel Fattah Said al-Sisi, is an enigma. He’s even more inscrutable because he is not -- to misquote Churchill -- an enigma wrapped in a dogma. He's too slippery to be filed under any kind of label. Depending on where you sit, that’s either alarming or reassuring.

from The Great Debate:

The surprising force behind change in Cairo

By Iman Bibars
July 31, 2013

In the space of two years, ordinary Egyptian citizens have organized and led two revolutions that caused two distinct dictatorial regimes to fall. These were street-led revolutions against autocratic regimes that had the support of the U.S. and were thus seen to be invincible.

from Ian Bremmer:

Is becoming Pakistan the best Egypt can hope for?

By Ian Bremmer
July 11, 2013

After the events in Egypt this past week, some in Washington are debating whether to call a coup a coup. The better question: Was the upheaval that toppled Hosni Mubarak in 2011 really a revolution? Think of what Egypt was before and after the fall of Mubarak, and what it is now. Before the Arab Spring the military was Egypt’s most critical political body, a stabilizing force in a country of weak politicians and weaker governance. That never changed. In fact, it hasn’t changed much in the past 60 years. The same military has deposed Mohamed Mursi, and whether it did so because the people demanded it or because the military wanted it is beside the point. Mursi is gone, the Constitution offers no effective oversight of the military, and the fate of the country still rests with a few select generals.

from The Great Debate:

Egypt: Protests built on a computer format

By Ahmed Amer
July 9, 2013

Protesters opposing President Mohamed Mursi at Tahrir Square in Cairo June 30, 2013. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

from John Lloyd:

The vacuum on the Nile

By John Lloyd
July 8, 2013

Egypt now lives in a political and constitutional vacuum. The present military rulers have dissolved the sole national level representative assembly, the Shura Council, and rescinded the constitution. Both, to be sure, were self-interested creations of the Muslim Brotherhood administration. But nothing has been put in their place.

from The Great Debate:

Historically, Egypt’s revolution is more of the same

By Jonathan Adelman
July 8, 2013

The history of revolutions tells us one sad fact: Egypt is in for a long period of violence, chaos and upheaval before it even begins to enter into the Promised Land of democracy.

from The Great Debate:

Egypt: Elections do not make a democracy

By Bill Schneider
July 8, 2013

An election is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for democracy.  That's the takeaway from the continuing upheaval in Egypt.

from David Rohde:

Egypt needs elections, not generals

By David Rohde
July 4, 2013

Mohamed Morsi’s one-year rule of Egypt was disastrous. He ruled by fiat, alienated potential allies and failed to stabilize the country’s spiraling economy. But a military coup is not an answer to Egypt’s problems.  It will exacerbate, not ease, Egypt’s vast political divide.