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from Photographers' Blog:

Harvest Moon rising

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London, England

By Toby Melville

"Moon, Daddy!" exclaimed my two year old daughter excitedly from the rear seat as I drove her back home from a day with the childminder. "Where's the moon?" I inquired as I concentrated on navigating through the evening rush hour on the busy roads of west London. "Over there: moon!" she repeated.

I knew it was a full and so-called Harvest Moon that night. I had a 500mm lens and decent enough 2 x converter in the trunk of the car as the every-ready back up emergency news set up. But the afternoon had been grotty and drizzly so not for the first time I had pretty much abandoned ideas for 'full moon' shots for another month.

But she was right: as I sat at the traffic lights in an interminable line, I could just catch a glimpse of the huge glowing orb peeping between clouds and houses. So, now the dilemma again of plenty a photographer when features and news just don't happen between pre-determined working hours or 'on-shift'. Continue home and then do the cherished fun evening routine of bedtime stories for Junior, followed by wee glass of wine and dinner? Or go moon chasing?

This time the picture hunt won. Mom was already home, and happy to do the bed routine for our daughter. I promised not to be long (heard that one before!), dropped off Little One, turned the car around, nipped down a couple of well used short cuts, all the while seeing the moon rising higher, darting between clouds and the wonderful dusk blue starting to turn blacker with the moon growing brighter and brighter. The race was on, and opportunities were fading fast! Plane lights flickered as they came into land ever nearer to the moon's path as I drove away from home, close to Heathrow airport, one of the world's busiest.

from India Insight:

Indian startup aims for the moon – and $30 million

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Rahul Narayan, who describes himself as a serial entrepreneur, is the founder of Team Indus. It is the only Indian team in a race to the moon by privately funded groups competing for the largest international incentive prize of all time - the Google Lunar X Prize.

Google is offering $30 million in prizes to the first privately funded teams to safely land a robot on the Moon, including a grand prize and other bonus prizes.

from Photographers' Blog:

Attempting to shoot the moon

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By Luke MacGregor

With very little understanding of astronomy but with the aid of a phone app, I began a three evening attempt to capture the moon with the Olympic Rings. The rings have been hanging iconically on Tower Bridge for the London 2012 Olympic Games and it was suggested to me that a full moon should - at the right angle - cross through them.

Day One - Having planned to be in the "perfect" spot on London Bridge with a good view of the Olympic Rings further up river and using the app information, I waited for the moon to rise. However the horizon itself was a little cloudy. When the moon eventually showed itself about 10 minutes after the app's moonrise time it was off to the right hand side of the bridge. I hadn't taken into account that the moon wouldn't rise in a vertical line but would travel across the sky. So, by a combination of it appearing late through cloud and miscalculation, I was totally in the wrong place. I rushed carrying the tripod with a heavy 400mm lens attached and the rest of my camera gear hanging off my shoulders - running off the bridge, down several flights of steps, and to the path alongside the River Thames to try re-align the moon with the rings. However, the moon moves surprising quickly. I couldn't manage to run far or fast enough in time to get the image before the moon rose high, over and above the bridge.

from Photographers' Blog:

A star that shined for me

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By Ueslei Marcelino

It's always a challenge to photograph nature, and the moon is certainly a part of that. Everyone at some time has looked at that giant orb shining in the sky.

In recent months I felt the urge to try my hand at photographing it. The simplest way is to record the moon up there alone, suspended in the dark. The hardest is to capture it with something in the foreground that can cause more visual impact.

from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra – Consequential choice

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Truth or Consequences?

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's message on Libya's ceasefire declaration was basically: she'll believe it when she sees it.

"We are going to be not responsive or impressed by words. We would have to see actions on the ground. And that is not yet at all clear," she said. USA

from Tales from the Trail:

Obama on the Moon: “been there” (done that)

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The moon is old news as far as President Barack Obama is concerned.

USA/Landing humans on asteroids and Mars and eventually living indefinitely in space is the future for the American people of Earth.

That's the vision of  the president who was born in 1961 when President John F. Kennedy declared that the United States would send a man to the Moon.

from The Great Debate:

Time for the space vision thing

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Florida - My head is spinning as I sit here waiting for President Obama to do what should have been done when the White House rolled out its budget for NASA: do the vision thing.

I have faith in POTUS to deliver the goods and explain his revolutionary approach to space exploration.

from India Insight:

Chandrayaan finds water ice on moon

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INDIA/MOON

After India's first lunar mission Chandrayaan - 1 found evidence of water on the moon's surface, scientists have now discovered more than 40 small craters with water ice on the moon.  

Chandrayaan - 1 carried a NASA radar on board which has detected deposits of water ice at both poles of the moon. 

from Tales from the Trail:

The First Draft: What was the Nobel committee thinking?

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OBAMA/Even before sunrise in Washington, tongues were wagging over the Norwegian Nobel Committee's choice of President Barack Obama to receive this year's Nobel Peace Prize. And the big question -- aside from whether a first-term president in his ninth month in office has done enough to deserve the award -- was, what was the committee thinking?

We know what they say they were thinking. Geir Lundestad, director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute, told ABC's "Good Morning America": "When we have a person whose ideals are so close to the ideals of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, we wanted to give whatever support we could to continued action in these fields."

from Pakistan: Now or Never?:

In Pakistan, not over the moon

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By Zeeshan Haider

Pakistan is battling Taliban militants, trying to patch up relations with old rival India and struggling to revive a limping economy but another issue has preoccupied the country over recent days: the sighting of the moon that markes the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan.

A row erupted when the Eid al Fitr holiday that follows Ramadan was celebrated in several parts of North West Frontier Province (NWFP) on Sunday, a day ahead of the rest of the country. Many Pakistanis say that violated a spirit of harmony and unity that should mark one of the
most important events of the Islamic calender.

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