from MediaFile:

Betwixt and between: Facebook’s act of desperation

June 5, 2012

On Monday, the Wall Street Journal reported that Facebook is considering lowering the minimum membership age to include tweens. It raised eyebrows and kindled a new discussion about privacy and the propriety of inviting youngsters into what the company aspires to make the world's biggest salesroom.

from MediaFile:

Facebook’s No. 1 music app raises $16 mln

August 31, 2011

Rihanna is one of BandPage's most popular artists

RootMusic is not one of the better known names in the digital music business, but in just 18 months  it has built the most popular music app on the world's largest social networking platform, Facebook.

from MediaFile:

Tech wrap: Apple vs HTC, round two

July 11, 2011

Apple has kicked its intellectual property dispute with Taiwanese smartphone maker HTC up a notch. The company filed a new complaint against HTC with a U.S. trade panel over some of its portable electronic devices and software, according to the panel’s website.  Apple filed a similar action against the company last year and could be trying to strengthen the case against its rival by adding new patents to its claim this time around, notes AllThingD’s John Paczkowski. “It’s another broad warning to the industry,” he writes.“If you’re bringing a new smartphone to market, you had better make damn sure it doesn’t infringe on Apple’s IP.”

from MediaFile:

Tech wrap: Verizon ditches unlimited data plan

July 5, 2011

Verizon Wireless customers, say goodbye to the days of  unlimited Web surfing for a set fee on your smartphone. The biggest U.S. mobile provider will stop offering its $30 all-you-can-surf  deal later this week, replacing it with a new tiered approach to data pricing. Customers who keep their smartphone use to 2 gigbytes (GB) of data per month or under won't see a change to their bill, but those who go over that limit will be slapped with an extra $10 charge per GB. Heavy mobile users will have the option of signing up for a 5 GB or 10 GB plan for $50 or $80 respectively. AT&T made a similar move last year, meaning Sprint is now the last major wireless carrier offering unlimited data use. CNET reports that Verizon will also start charging for access to its mobile hot-spot service, which up until this week has been free and without bandwidth restrictions.

from MediaFile:

Tech wrap: And Myspace goes to . . .

June 29, 2011

News Corp’s hunt to find a buyer for once-mighty social networking website Myspace has finally ended. Specific Media, an online advertising firm, has agreed to buy the site for about $35 million, a source familiar with the deal told Reuters. News Corp will retain a minority 5 percent stake in the website it purchased six years ago for $580 million. More than half of the site’s 500 employees are expected to be laid off as part of the deal.

from Entrepreneurial:

Entrepreneur Peter Yared: Social is “so over”

By Guest Contributor
June 28, 2011

-- Connie Loizos is a contributor to PE Hub, a Thomson Reuters publication. This story originally appeared here. --

from DealZone:

Deals wrap: J&J’s $21.6 billion orthopedic buy

April 27, 2011

A general view shows Swiss medical devices maker Synthes' headquarters in Oberdorf, April 25, 2011. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

from MediaFile:

Tencent, De Wolfe among interested buyers for Myspace

April 7, 2011

De Wolfe and Murdoch in happier times (Photo: Reuters)

De Wolfe and Murdoch in happier times (Photo: Reuters)

Chinese Internet holding company Tencent, Myspace founder Chris De Wolfe and Myspace's current management team are among the 20 odd names kicking the tires at the once might social network to see whether it's worth buying outright or partnering in some sort of spin-out with current owner News Corp.

from Reuters Investigates:

Myspace and Facebook: the numbers tell it all

April 7, 2011

Yinka Adegoke delves into what happened at Myspace in his special report today: "How News Corp got lost in Myspace."

from MediaFile:

Tech wrap: Amazon’s storm cloud

March 29, 2011

People sit in Washington Square Park at New York University in New York, October 21, 2009.Amazon.com faced a backlash from the music industry after it introduced Cloud Drive, an online "music locker" that lets customers store music files on the company's Web servers instead of their own hard drives and play them over an Internet connection directly from browsers and on phones running Google’s Android OS. Sony Music was upset by Amazon's decision to launch the service without new licenses for music streaming.