from The Great Debate:

If secrecy is the whole point, how do you make intelligence agencies share?

March 25, 2016

A general view shows the U.S. embassy in a thermal image taken with an infrared camera in Berlin October 27, 2013. A German newspaper said on Sunday that U.S. President Barack Obama knew his intelligence service was eavesdropping on Angela Merkel as long ago as 2010, contradicting reports that he had told the German leader he did not know. The U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) denied that Obama had been informed about the operation by the NSA chief in 2010, as reported by the German newspaper. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS)

The U.S. embassy in Berlin in a thermal image taken with an infrared camera in Berlin, October 27, 2013. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

from The Great Debate:

Yes, the feds can hack your iPhone. No, it isn’t easy.

February 18, 2016

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an Apple event in San Francisco, California March 9, 2015.  REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES  - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)

Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook speaks during an Apple event in San Francisco, California, March 9, 2015. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

from The Great Debate:

Why NSA surveillance is worse than you’ve ever imagined

May 11, 2015



Last summer, after months of encrypted emails, I spent three days in Moscow hanging out with Edward Snowden for a Wired cover story. Over pepperoni pizza, he told me that what finally drove him to leave his country and become a whistleblower was his conviction that the National Security Agency was conducting illegal surveillance on every American. Thursday, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York agreed with him.

from The Great Debate:

U.S. spying on Germany: Making enemies out of allies, and for what?

July 11, 2014

German Chancellor Merkel attends a session of Bundestag in Berlin

What were they thinking?

In the wake of last fall's revelation that the National Security Agency had wiretapped German Chancellor Angela Merkel's cell phone, the report of U.S. intelligence’s involvement in two other likely cases of spying on Germany is mind-boggling.

from Stories I’d like to see:

More questions for Snowden and the GOP establishment takes on the 2016 primaries

June 3, 2014

Accused government whistleblower Snowden is seen on a screen as he speaks via videoconference with members of the Committee on legal Affairs and Human Rights of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe in Strasbourg

1. Snowden questions NBC missed:

In his interview with NBC’s Brian Williams last week, Edward Snowden tried to bolster his credentials this way: “I was trained as a spy in sort of the traditional sense of the word -- in that I lived and worked undercover, overseas, pretending to work in a job … and even being assigned a name that was not mine …. Now, the government might deny these things. They might frame it in certain ways, and say, ‘Oh, well, you know, he's a low-level analyst.’”

from The Great Debate:

Senate must rein in the NSA

June 2, 2014

An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

The House of Representatives seemed poised last month to rein in the government's ability to spy on its citizens by prohibiting the bulk collection of Americans' telephone records. On the eve of the vote, however, the Obama administration and House leadership intervened. In secret negotiations, they took a carving knife to the bill, removing key privacy protections.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Rand Paul: The pied piper

March 24, 2014

The warm welcome that Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) received from an audience of mostly young Americans at the University of California, Berkeley, last week should send a shiver down the spines of Democrats.

from Stories I’d like to see:

Amazon’s price increase, Congressional whistleblowers, and a question for President Obama

March 18, 2014

1. Are customers really upset at the Amazon Prime price increase?

The day after Amazon raised the annual subscription price for its Prime service from $79 to $99, the New York Times ran a story headlined, “Complaints As Amazon Raises Cost of Prime.” I found the reporting lacking and the headline unfair.

from The Great Debate:

How the NSA undermines national security

March 6, 2014

Questions about the legitimacy and efficacy of the mass-surveillance techniques used by the National Security Agency continue to swirl around the globe. The debate in the United States has mostly focused on a misleading trade-off between security and privacy.

from The Great Debate:

Reagan’s true legacy: The Tea Party

February 6, 2014


Challenging the status quo is the correct condition of American conservatism.

At the end of the American Revolution, Benjamin Rush, who had signed the Declaration of Independence, vowed that though the war with Great Britain was over, the Revolution would go on.