from India Insight:

China? India? We’re grateful for their help: Nepal’s ambassador to India

By Reuters Staff
April 28, 2015

By Mayank Bhardwaj and Ratnajyoti Dutta

A 7.9-magnitude earthquake jolted Nepal and parts of northern India on Saturday, killing more than 4,300 people and injuring thousands more. It is the most destructive earthquake that Nepal has suffered since 1934. Several countries have offered relief, most notably China and India. The rival nations, which together surround Nepal, have made an effort to woo the stricken nation even as they eye each other from their own borders.

from The Great Debate:

Fighting for democracy in South Asia

By Nisha Biswal
November 15, 2013

For the first time in post-colonial history, all of the countries of South Asia are democracies.

from Photographers' Blog:

Living with “werewolf syndrome”

November 6, 2013

Dolkha District, Nepal

By Navesh Chitrakar

People have always had a certain fascination with the unknown – a fascination that has been experienced by Devi Budhathoki and three of her children, who all suffer from a rare genetic condition that causes large amounts of thick hair to grow on their bodies.

from Photographers' Blog:

The man with the coconut and the GoPro

May 23, 2013

Lalitpur, Nepal

By Navesh Chitrakar

Rato Machhindranath is the god of rain, so huge crowds gather in Lalitpur around a 32-meter (104 foot) high tower mounted on a chariot during the chariot festival in an effort to ensure good rains and prevent drought.

from Photographers' Blog:

Man versus wild

April 11, 2013

Kathmandu, Nepal

By Navesh Chitrakar

I was on my way to cover another assignment when I got news of a leopard that had wandered into a town. Without wasting any time, I turned my motorbike around and rushed toward the scene. When I reached the area, I saw a huge crowd of people, most of them with big sticks, pieces of bamboo or farming tools, but I couldn't see a leopard anywhere.

from Full Focus:

Imaging religion: Navesh Chitrakar

October 12, 2012

Nepal-based photographer Navesh Chitrakar documents almost all the country's religious festivals. In this interview, Navesh discusses the art of photography and reflects on the state of the nation's festivals.

from Why Nations Fail:

Caste and coercion in Nepal

By Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson
March 15, 2012

Slavery in Nepal was abolished only in 1921. Corvée, forced labor, was made illegal in 1952, but survived. It was only in 2000 that various sorts of coerced and bonded labor finally disappeared.

from Why Nations Fail:

Who’s afraid of economic development?

By Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson
March 15, 2012

Surely even the most kleptocratic dictator would be in favor of economic development. Economic development means greater income, greater taxes and more stuff to grab, so what’s not to like about it? But actually, it often doesn’t work that way.

from Photographers' Blog:

Two sides of a living God

September 29, 2011

By Navesh Chitrakar

Born and raised in Kathmandu's Newar community I am familiar with Lord Ganesh. His elephant head attached to a human body makes him easy to identify. Ganesh is honored at the beginning of rituals and ceremonies as we celebrate religious festivals.

from Photographers' Blog:

A window seat to Everest

September 27, 2011

By Tim Chong

I was covering the Singapore F1 Grand Prix over the weekend.

Sunday was race day and as usual I woke up a bit early to check the news. I saw on my twitter feed that a plane carrying tourists to see the Himalayan range and Mount Everest had crashed in Nepal.