from Full Focus:

Burning Man

September 2, 2014

Over 65,000 revelers from all over the world gathered at the sold out festival to spend a week in the remote desert cut off from much of the outside world to experience art, music and the unique community that develops.

from Photographers' Blog:

At a Colorado Cattle Drive

July 11, 2014

Igancio, United States

By Lucas Jackson

According to official statistics, around one percent of the United States’ population operates farms or ranches. After eight years of living in New York, I have discovered that the land rights issues that I remember my parents discussing when I was a child in rural New Mexico are all but invisible to the remaining 99 percent.

from Full Focus:

Nevada’s gold rush

June 10, 2014

It took almost two years to finally get the green light, but Reuters photographer Rick Wilking was given near-total access to Newmont Mining's massive series of open pit and underground gold mines in northeast Nevada – one of the largest open-pit gold mine complexes in the United States. It's an industry few see in-person – and the results are in your jewelry and in almost any electronic device you own.

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: Solving America’s homegrown Putin dilemma

May 6, 2014

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Bundy: Counterfeit hero

By Neal Gabler
April 25, 2014

The shelf life of heroes isn’t what it used to be.

Once upon a time, a hero would burst upon the scene -- a Charles A. Lindbergh, a Babe Ruth, a Red Grange, an Audie Murphy, a Neil Armstrong -- and he would not only receive reverent acclaim, that acclaim would last for decades. Sometimes forever.

from Photographers' Blog:

Nevada showdown

April 23, 2014

Bunkerville, Nevada

By Jim Urquhart

"I've got a clear shot at four of them," the man with a rifle beside me said, as he aimed his weapon in the direction of U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) officers.

from Photographers' Blog:

Burning bright, loud and intense

September 10, 2013

Black Rock Desert of Nevada

By Jim Bourg

Having been to Burning Man several times now, I went to the 2013 event determined to convey in some new way to people who have never been the intensity, the size and the sometimes overwhelming sensory overload of the experience. It is truly like nothing else on earth and sometimes feels alien and otherworldly.

from MuniLand:

Do muniland’s flare-ups signal a bigger fire?

By Cate Long
July 16, 2012

Now that three California towns have declared bankruptcy in the past few weeks, the mainstream media is abuzz with headlines of imminent doom for state and local governments. Adding fuel to the fire were Warren Buffett's comments on Bloomberg TV about how cities may find it easier to declare bankruptcy after seeing others do it:

from MuniLand:

Why America won’t pay for more stimulus

By Cate Long
June 1, 2012

This morning's jobs report revealed that 79,000 net new jobs were created in the country in May, nearly 50 percent below the consensus forecast of 150,000. Almost immediately following the release, there were loud and insistent calls for another round of monetary and fiscal stimulus. "Job growth stumbles again, raising pressure on Fed," the Reuters headline ran. My fellow Reuters blogger Felix Salmon called for immediate federal stimulus funded by more debt issuance. Felix's rationale, like many others', is that with U.S. borrowing costs so low, stimulating current economic activity is a higher priority than worrying about paying down the debt in the future. Or to put it differently, a little more debt is preferable to enduring the economic pain of the economy rightsizing itself.

from MuniLand:

States receive crumbs from mortgage settlement

By Cate Long
February 10, 2012

The $25 billion mortgage-fraud settlement that was announced yesterday came after 18 months of coordinated action by the Department of Justice, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and 49 state attorneys-general. The settlement is carved up so that homeowners and governments at the state and federal levels each receive some compensation. Given the scale of national losses, it's a tiny penalty for banks that engaged in egregious servicing and foreclosure practices, and it will do little to repair the widespread economic damage.