from Nicholas Wapshott:

The analogue titans’ last gasp against the digital giants

By Nicholas Wapshott
August 4, 2014

amazon-hachette

Amazon’s bullying of the book publisher Hachette and the uninvited bid by Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox to swallow rival TimeWarner has caused some economists and commentators to ask, why are such aggressive moves not attracting the attention of the Justice Department’s trust-busters? Both moves are textbook examples of how monopoly power can abuse -- or so they would have seemed not long ago.

from The Great Debate:

The analogue titans’ last gasp against the digital giants

By Nicholas Wapshott
August 4, 2014

[CROSSPOST blog: 2586 post: 1600]

Original Post Text:
amazon-hachette

Amazon’s bullying of the book publisher Hachette and the uninvited bid by Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox to swallow rival TimeWarner has caused some economists and commentators to ask, why are such aggressive moves not attracting the attention of the Justice Department’s trust-busters? Both moves are textbook examples of how monopoly power can abuse -- or so they would have seemed not long ago.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Rupert Murdoch’s troubles are far from over

By Nicholas Wapshott
July 1, 2014

News Corporation CEO Rupert Murdoch leaves his flat with Rebekah Brooks, Chief Executive of News International,  in central London

The acquittal of Rupert Murdoch’s favorite executive, the flame-haired Rebekah Brooks, on charges of phone hacking and destroying the evidence might have marked the final act in one of the most bruising and expensive chapters in the history of News Corp.

from Breakingviews:

Tribune politics play into Murdoch’s hands

July 10, 2013

By Jeffrey Goldfarb
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Contemplating life after Murdoch

By Nicholas Wapshott
July 10, 2013

Rupert Murdoch has been summoned back to explain to British lawmakers comments he made at a private meeting with his London tabloid journalists. It seems that whatever regrets he has expressed in public about the phone-hacking and police bribery scandal that has so far cost his company $57.5 million, in private he thinks the affair has been overblown. There have been 126 arrests so far, with six convictions, a further 42 awaiting trial, and up to 10 more awaiting charges.

from Breakingviews:

Zuckerberg and Murdoch rock air-governance shows

June 11, 2013

By Richard Beales
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Alison Frankel:

News Corp deal: a new way to police corporate political spending?

By Alison Frankel
April 22, 2013

On Monday, the directors and officers of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp agreed to settle a derivative suit accusing them of breaching their duty to shareholders by failing to avert the phone-hacking scandal at the company's British newspapers. News Corp's insurers will pay $139 million, in what shareholder lawyers atGrant & Eisenhofer called the largest-ever cash settlement of derivative claims in Delaware Chancery Court. The settlement, which comes as News Corp prepares to split its news and entertainment branches into two publicly traded companies, was produced after several months of mediation that took place while the company's motion to dismiss was pending before Vice Chancellor John Noble.

from John Lloyd:

A free press without total freedom

By John Lloyd
March 19, 2013

Journalism gyrates dizzily between the dolorous grind of falling revenue and the Internet’s vast opportunities of a limitless knowledge and creation engine. On the revenue front, no news is good. The just-published Pew Center’s “State of the US News Media” opens with the bleak statement that “a continued erosion of news reporting resources converged with growing opportunities for those in politics, government agencies, companies and others to take their messages directly to the public.” Not only, that is, is the trade shrinking, but those who once depended on its gatekeepers have found their own ways to visibility.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

The crumbling of the Murdoch dynasty

By Nicholas Wapshott
December 4, 2012
Rupert Murdoch has had a rough few weeks. He had to race to Melbourne, Australia, to visit his 103-year-old mother, Dame Elisabeth, who has died in Australia.* There is nothing like the death of your mother to remind you of your own mortality.

Then last month the political party he supports and largely owns lost the election. When you have Sarah Palin, Mike Huckabee, Roger Ailes, Karl Rove, John Bolton, Liz Cheney, William Kristol, Dick Morris, Oliver North, Rick Santorum, and Newt Gingrich on the books and have all your media properties conduct a virulent, ad hominem campaign against the president, then watch the Republicans lose so convincingly, it must be hard to know where you went wrong.

from Jack Shafer:

The Daily didn’t fail–Rupert gave up

By Jack Shafer
December 3, 2012

When you're as wealthy as Rupert Murdoch ($9.4 billion) and you control a company as resource-rich as News Corp (market cap $58.1 billion), shuttering a 22-month-old business like The Daily doesn't signify failure as much as it does surrender.